Norwescon 23 Program Book

NWC23-acc.pdf

Dublin Core

Title

Norwescon 23 Program Book

Subject

Norwescon 23

Description

The full souvenir program book for Norwescon 23.

Creator

Michael Brocha

Publisher

Norwescon

Date

April 20–23, 2000

Contributor

Alex Demboski

Rights

Contents Copyright © 2000 by Norwescon for the contributors.

Language

English

Text Item Type Metadata

Text

The Northwest Science Fiction Society proudly presents

NORWESCON 23

April 20–23, 2000

Annual Northwest Science Fiction and Fantasy Convention

[Ad] HarperCollins

HarperCollins Publishers_ congratulates its nominees for the 1999 Philip K. Dick Award

Vacuum Diagrams by Stephen Baxter published by HarperPrism

Code of Conduct by Kristine Smith published by Avon Eos

and salutes all the nominees.

HarperCollins Publishers

www.harpercollins.com

Color Scans, Separations & Film Output
Designers Service Bureau, Olympia, WA

NORWESCON 23 CONVENTION COMMITTEE

General Chair: Pat Booze
Administrative Assistant: Doug Booze
Mailing Services: Gayle MacArthur
Public Relations: William Sadorus
Convention Outreach: William Sadorus
Exhibit & Fan Tables: Beth Allen
Promotions: William Sadorus
Recording Secretary: Alyxx Feltser
Historian: Carolyn Palms
Vice Chair: Betty Claar
Hotel Liaison: Jeanine Swanson
Business: Jayson Claar
Treasurer: Toffer Erikson
Member Services: Ben Schreiber
Assistant: Jeff Cornish
Information: Patrick Nash
Lost & Found/Cloakroom: Carolyn Palms
Peacebonding: Nancy Brown
Children/Teen Services: Wendy Irvin
KidKon: Max Irvin
KidKon Older Children: Mika Bartroll
Quiet Room: Miriam Kaye
Teen Response: Wendy, Cheryl and Miriam
Registration: Mike Orosz
Assistant: Karen Mostella
Computer Support: Scott Jansen
Static Services: Eric Weber
Art Show: Association of Operation Volunteers
Dealers Room: Tracy Knoedler, Charlie Knoedler
Fanzine Library: R’ykandar Korra’ti
Gaming: Robert Moshell
Hospitality: Elizabeth “Dragon Lady” Warren
Publications: Michael Brocha
Web Page: Jack Beslanwitch
Convention Services: Cheryl Ferguson
Assistant: Damian Weaver
ADA Liason: Terry Swan
Event Services: Jordan Orr
Assistant: Nick Feltser
Properties/Technical: Jay Miller
Lighting Director: Paul Wocken
Con Maps/Layouts: Michael Citrak
Stage Management: Grace McKelvy-Smith
Assistant: Nathan Smith
Media Services: Alan Halfhill
Office Services: Jody Franzen-Schreiber
Assistant: Damian Weaver
Charitable Events: Cheri Playter
Daily 'Zine: R’ykandar Korra’ti
Site Services: Steve Cook
Dispatch: Brad Nelson
Security: Peter Horvath
Signs: Prudence Bohnas
Transportation: Eric Pawtowski
Transportation Assistants: Daniel Pawtowski, Yvonne Pawtowski
Programming: Bob Grieve
Administrative Assistant: Ali Young
Assistant Programmer: Judy Suryan
Art Track: Steve Adams
Autograph Party: George Nyhen, Lisa Woodings
Camarilla Liaison: Julie Christensen
Costuming Track: Lori Edwards
Filk Track: Karen Rall
Gaming Track: Brannon W. Boren
Green Room: Alyxx Feltser, Connie Kesterson, Gene Romaine
Guest Relations: Robert Suryan
Assistant Guest Relations: Ali Young
Literature Track: Duane Wilkins
Movie Previews: Daryl Allison
Opening/Closing Ceremonies: George Nyhen, Lisa Woodings
Opening/Closing Ceremonies Host: Richard Stephens
P.K. Dick Award Reception: William Sadorus
Poetry Track: GregRobin Smith
Pro Reception: George Nyhen, Lisa Woodings
Science Track: Burt Webb
Writers Workshop: Fairwood Writers Group, David Addleman
Hard Planet Cafe: William Sadorus
Entertainment Services: Keith Johnson
Assistant: LouAnna Valentine
Masquerade: Peggy Stewart
Masquerade Assistant: Felice Nightengale
Dances: LouAnna Valentine
Thursday Dance: Kim Valentine
Stardance: Shawn Marier
MasterMix Cafe: Keith Johnson
Laser Tag: Prudence Bohnas
SCA Fair: Priscilla Verzola
Personnel: Shawn Marier
Staff Support: Elinor Fadgen, Marjorie Rosen, Katrina Marier
Volunteers: Mary Westerling
Assistant: Vicky Rudesill
Room Hosts: Wilma Jensen, Deborah Wood, Marjorie Stratton
Crisis Management: Denise Prowse
Club Liaison: Autumn Groves
Lobby Table: Charlene Bell, Becky Fallis
Gopher: Larry Stratton
Night Crawler: Becky Citrak

The Northwest Science Fiction Society proudly presents
NORWESCON 23
April 20–23, 2000
Annual Northwest Science Fiction and Fantasy Convention

April 20–23, 2000 - DoubleTree Hotel/SeaTac

Twenty-Third Annual Northwest Regional Science Fiction Convention

Sponsored by the:
Northwest Science Fiction Society
P.O. Box 68547
Seattle, WA 98168

Dedicated to the memory of Marion Zimmer Bradley, DeForest Kelley, Shel Silverstein, John Sladek, A.E. van Vogt, James White and all of the other greats we lost this year

Guest of Honor
David Brin

Guest of Honor
Gregory Benford

Artist Guest of Honor
Barclay Shaw

Fan Guest of Honor
Bjo Trimble

Fan Guest of Honor
John Trimble

Spotlighted Publisher
Jennifer Brehl for HarperCollins and Eos

Table of Contents

Cover Copyright © 2000 Barclay Shaw
Programming: 2
Writer Guest of Honor: David Brin by William H. Calvin: 29
Writer Guest of Honor: Gregory Benford by Peter Nicholls: 31
Gallery: 35
Artist Guest of Honor: Barclay Shaw by Paul Chadwick: 39
Spotlighted Publisher: HarperCollins and Eos, and Jennifer Brehl: 41
Fan Guests of Honor: John and Bjo Trimble by Lora Boehm: 42
Guests of Norwescon: 43
Members of Norwescon: 69
Advertisers & Art Credits: 72
Acknowledgments: 72
Nametag © 2000 by Barclay Shaw

We are ADA aware.

Norwescon Voice Mail: 206–270–7850
E-Mail: info@norwescon.org
addresschange@norwescon.org
lostandfound@norwescon.org
chair@norwescon.org
and many more which can be found on our web page.
Web Page: http://www.norwescon.org

Contents Copyright © 2000 by Norwescon for the contributors.
All opinions expressed in this publication are those of the authors and not necessarily those of Norwescon or the Northwest Science Fiction Society.

[Artwork] Mercycle © 2000 by Barclay Shaw.
Cover for the book by Piers Anthony, published by Berkley Books, 1992. Oil on acrylic.

INTRODUCTION TO THE PROGRAM

The Norwescon Program can be regarded as sort of “meta-convention”—that is, the raw materials out of which one can construct one’s own convention. We expect that no one attending Norwescon will experience exactly the same con, but do hope we’ve provided you with the opportunity to have the convention you want.

The following listing shows most of the programming events. Things change daily before and even during the con and panelists sometimes have to drop out. More up-to-the-minute changes are listed at the Information Table in the convention lobby and on the hour-by-hour signs outside of each programming room. Programs start on the hour and are one hour long unless stated otherwise.

The convention committee welcomes you to Norwescon 23 and hopes that you have an enjoyable convention.

Programming

THURSDAY

3 PM

Galaxy Quest: The Phenomenon
Cascade 5 & 6
Fandom From the tacky costuming to the fannish geeks, how close to home is Galaxy Quest?
Betty Bigelow (M), Richard Stephens, Adam Buchner, Bjo Trimble

3–5 PM

Fanzine Library
Cascade 3 & 4
Fandom
The Fanzine Library is now open for your reading pleasure. Come and browse through the collection of fanzines, clubzines, APAs, and other fannish literature.

4 PM

UFOs: Where Did They Go?
Cascade 5 & 6
Science
Are alien spacecraft still exploring the Earth? Or did they ever really exist? Isn’t something defined as a UFO because it is unidentified? Will Steve Dallas' brain ever be really safe? Are Fox Mulder’s eyes brown?
Nels Eric Satterlund (M), David Graham, Bryce Walden,

4–6 PM

Meet Fandom
Grand Ballroom 2
Fandom
Clubs, cons, and organizations form the backbone of fandom. Representatives will be here to extol the virtues and drum up support for their particular group.
John Trimble (M)

5 PM

Reading: Rebecca Neason
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
Rebecca will be reading from the first book in her new series: The Thirteenth Scroll which is due out in June 2001.

Science Fiction vs. Science
Cascade 5 & 6
Science
In the early days of science fiction, many authors would make predictions of what scientific discoveries the future would bring. They would fill their audience with wonder prognosticating technological advances and the accompanying geysers from the well of knowledge. Is the sf of today keeping up with the real thing? How is science fiction lagging behind science and technology? Are we now marveling more at what the truth is than what we read as fiction?
Ted Butler (M), Elton T. Elliott, James C. Glass, Nels Eric Satterlund

5–6:30 PM

Caricatures
Cascade 13
Art
Learn how to do caricatures with artist Larry Lewis.

5–7 PM

Science Fiction Pictionary
Cascade 7 & 8
Art
This game is a molding oldie but still a lot of fun. Come play this old favorite with a sf/fantasy twist.
Steve Adams (M), Roberta Gregory, Nicola Leonard, Craig Figley

5–7 PM

Improbable Poetic Improvisation: Stump the Imposter!
Cascade 12
Poetry
Panelists will do improvisational speeches to your situations mixed with standard Shakespearean characters: Puck meets Han Solo, Henry the 5th at the Alamo, MacBeth and Kenneth Starr. “Verily, Luke, I am thy Father!” Come have fun!
Andrew Dolbeck (M), GregRobin AV Smith, Donna Barr, Brian D. Oberquell, Joan M. McCarty, and you!

6–6:30 PM

Reading: Kij Johnson
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
Kij will be reading from her novel which has received rave reviews. The Fox Woman is about a shape-changing fox in Heian, Japan. Come and listen!

6 PM

Ethnic Influences in Fashion Design and Costuming
Cascade 5 & 6
Costuming
Taking ethnic designs and incorporating them into your science fiction and fantasy costumes. Also discussed will be current media uses of ethnic designs in such movies as Star Wars: The Phantom Menace, Topsy Turvy, and Anna and the King.
Julie Hoverson (M), Betty Bigelow, Terri “Sprite” Specht, Garth Stubbs, Wendy Chateau

Star Trek: The Slide Show
Grand Ballroom 2
Fandom
A humorous and loving look at 30 years of Star Trek. A must see for all trekkers, trekkies, and anyone, with stars in their heart and the cosmos in their eyes who has ever wanted to boldly go.
Bjo Trimble

6:30–7 PM

Reading: Mel Gilden
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
Mel will read “The Little Finger of the Left Hand,” which recently appeared in Bruce Coville’s Book of Alien Visitors. A charming author with a rich voice; this should be a delightful half-hour.

7 PM

Fanzine Library
Cascade 3 & 4
Fandom
The Fanzine Library is now open for your reading pleasure. Come and browse through the collection of fanzines, clubzines, APAs, and other fannish literature.

Norwescon 23 Opening Ceremonies
Grand Ballroom 2
Traditional
Richard Stephens and Lori Edwards have cooked up something special to introduce you to Norwescon 23 and to some of our Guests of Honor. Stars! Planets! Rocket ships! Potted plants! Live girls on stage!
Richard Stephens (M), Lori Edwards, Barclay Shaw, Bjo and John Trimble, Jennifer Brehl, Pat Booze, Robert J Grieve

[Artwork] Isolated Parallel Processors © 2000 by Barclay Shaw.
Originally published by DARPA, 1997. Digital.

[Artwork] Eurydice © 2000 by Barclay Shaw.
Cover for the book Megagnomes by Alan Dean Eoster, published by Ballantine Books, 1990. Acrylic.

8 PM

Reading: Mona Lee
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
From her novel, Alien Child, Mona has selected readings which will illustrate the development of alien psychic abilities in the main character, Dana, through childhood and early adulthood as she finds her place in the world.

Cultivating Costume Ideas
Cascade 5 & 6
Costuming
How to brainstorm ideas for new designs and presentations and options for spicing up old costumes.
Richard Stephens (M), Lori Edwards, Garth Stubbs, Keri Lynn Doering

Y2K Revisited
Cascade 7 & 8
Socio-cultural
Did it live up to the hype or was this the biggest media flop of the 20th century? Were all the Chicken Littles correct or is Foghorn laughing his ass off? Hey, all you survivalists out there in the hills: Did you keep your receipts? Brian D. Oberquell (M), Richard Michaels, Larry Lewis, David Graham

Friends of Bill W.
Olympic 1

Sex in Space
Evergreen 3
Science (Mature Theme)
Everyone is talking about it, but is anyone doing it? What will zero gee do to the wild thing? How will we decide who is on top when there is no right side up?
Bryce Walden, Brian J. Tillotson, Robyn Sondra Wills

8–9:30 PM

The Erotic Paintings of Ray Pelley
Evergreen 1 & 2
Art (Adult Theme)
An erotic art slide show of the works of this Dharmic Engineer. No one under the age of 18 will be admitted!

8–10 PM

Clay-O-Rama
Cascade 13
Art
Come and have an hysterical time while learning how to work with clay, build monsters, and pit them against each other in a really earthy kind of mortal combat. One hint: let the Wookie win. Betty Bigelow

8 PM - MIDNIGHT

Camarilla Gaming
Cascade 11
Gaming
The Cam is back and their fangs have been sharpened. Watch out! Julie Christensen

8 PM - 5 AM

Open Circle
Evergreen 4
Filking
Come and join friends, both old and new, for an evening of music and storytelling. Karen Ralls

9 PM

Reading: Joan M. McCarty
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature (Mature Theme)
Joan will read from The Harbingers. Before Christ came mankind’s greatest challenge. The “Creator,” bored with the way his newest experiment was progressing, sent to Earth a catalyst, the “Four,” the Nephillim, to test mankind’s faith and morality. The outcome of mankind’s existence lies with a shepherd boy, a sage, and one of the truly faithful. With unrealistic odds, can three of the “Chosen” really change the way of the world?

Corsets and Other Contraptions
Cascade 5 & 6
Costuming
For anyone who is curious about the history of unmentionables, this discussion will include the origin of various corsets and contraptions used to support men’s and women’s clothing through the centuries.
JoAnne Kirley (M), Anita Taylor, R. Margo Loes, Lori Edwards

9–11 PM

Flirting and the Best Pickup Lines to Use at a Convention
Evergreen 3
Art
So you have a whole convention ahead of you and it’s guaranteed that you’ll have the opportunity to meet new people. Don’t get tongue-tied! Prepare ahead of time and arm yourself with a plethora of witty repartee for those moments when you just have to say something, and don’t want to risk saying the wrong thing.
Donna Barr (M), Kij Johnson, Alan Fairies, Larry Lewis, Rhias K. Hall, N. Monique Mitchell

9 PM - 2 AM

Kim Valentine’s World of Music Dance Party
Grand Ballroom 2 & 3
Dance
Break out your dancing shoes and boogie the night away. The con is young!

10 PM - MIDNIGHT

Leather and Lace, Leash and Collar
Cascade 7 & 8
Fandom (Mature Theme)
Fewer and fewer eyebrows are being raised as more and more fen are leading each other around on leashes. Where in the world did BDSM enter into fandom? What has any of this to do with science fiction? Can one be a Dominatrix and a sf fan at the same time?
Deborah Christian (Teramis) (M), Alan Fairies, Robyn Sondra Wills, Diana Vick

10 PM - MIDNIGHT

Fanzine Library
Cascade 3 & 4
Fandom
The Fanzine Library is now open for your reading pleasure. Come and browse through the collection of fanzines, clubzines, APAs, and other fannish literature.

10 PM - MIDNIGHT

Maundy Thursday Church Service
Olympic 1
A celebration of the Holy Eucharist based on Rite Two of the Episcopal Church, with traditional foot washing. Members of all faiths are welcome to come to the service and all baptized Christians are invited to share communion with us.
Brought to the Norwescon membership by the Order of St. Chiros

10 PM - 1 AM

Bodacious Babes! Finding Sexy and Seductive Costumes for the Luxury Sized Fan
Evergreen 1 & 2
Costuming (Mature Theme)
Creating a titillating or sensual look for voluptuous body types. A practical panel discussing cut, fabric, design and pattern selection, accessories and attitudes for finding that sexy look.
Julie Hoverson (M), Renee Byrd, R. Margo Loes, Wendy Chateau, Terri “Sprite” Specht

11 PM - 1 AM

Horror Readings
Cascade 5&6
Literature
The witching hour is back at Norwescon as readers spin dark tales of the macabre. Come and find out the true meaning of horror.
John Pelan (M), Joan M. McCarty, Brian Tillotson, James C. Glass, Robyn Sondra Wills

FRIDAY

9 AM

Tai Chi
Grand Ballroom 2
Traditional
A great way to start the morning and prepare yourself for the day. Center yourself, Grasshopper! Steven Barnes

9–11 AM

Fanzine Library
Cascade 3 & 4
Fandom
The Fanzine Library is now open for your reading pleasure. Come and browse through the collection of fanzines, clubzines, APAs, and other fannish literature.

10 AM

Free-lance Writing in Role Playing Games
Cascade 5
Gaming
If you have ever considered writing for a RPG, come out and talk to the folks who do it for a living. Have your illusions of riches and fame crushed by the experts or let them help you figure out how to be better than those other wannabes.
Brannon Boren (M), Jason Carl

[Artwork] Advertisment for Ace Books © 2000 by Barclay Shaw.

Create a Horror Game Scenario in One Hour
Cascade 8
When you want to make some of your own scary fun.
Julie Hoverson

Stupid Writer Tricks
Evergreen 2
Literature
So you just finished your short story or novel and you’re bursting to send it out to the publisher. Before you do—hear from the pros on the dos and don’ts on publisher etiquette.
Peter Schneider (M), Kathryn Cramer, Patrick Swenson, Kim Mohan

NASA vs. Private Space Launches
Evergreen 4
Science
Government funding for space projects has its rewards and drawbacks. What will happen if Boeing decides to do its own space program? What if Bill Gates decides he wants to take a vacation on Mars? Should privatization be encouraged or discouraged?
Elton T. Elliott (M), Jim Burk, Peter Douglas Ward, James C. Glass, Christopher Erickson, David D. Graham

10–11:30 AM

New Wave vs. Old Wave SF
Cascade 6
Literature
How have trends in science fiction changed since the early years of the genre? Join the Amazing Stories editorial staff for a lively discussion of sf themes, from Buck Rogers and Bug-Eyed Monsters to cyberpunk and Star Trek.
Sue Cook (M), Kim Mohan, Johnny Wilson

10–11:30 AM

Literary Kung Fu
Evergreen 1
Literature
A demonstration of martial art techniques for writers. Are you portraying it correctly? Does your manuscript read like a black belt in karate or like a really bad “B” movie? Learn what the moves look like to be able to write about them.
David Addleman, Toni Anzetti

10–11:30 AM

Writers of the Future: Battlefield Earth
Grand Ballroom 3
Literature
Folks from Bridge Publications will be on hand to let us know all about this epic feature that will be released next month. The movie will star John Travolta, Barry Pepper, and Forrest Whitaker. Come and get a glimpse of the movie and find out about the production.
Scott Welch

10 AM - NOON

Let’s Make A Movie—Part I
Evergreen 3
Fandom
Hey, baby, I can make you a star! No, really. See, we are making this movie at Nor-wescon this year and… Yeah, that’s right! A movie! We will be doing the whole nine yards. Script. Production. Filming. Acting. Everything! So why don’t you join us? We’ll watch the finished product on Sunday. Really cool, huh?
Edward Martin III (M), Leopoldo Marino

10 AM - NOON

Costumer’s Coffee Klatch (Stitch & Bitch)
Olympic 1
Costuming
A casual problem solving/costuming discussion over coffee. Bring your sewing project and join us!
Cheryl Glover, Lori Edwards, Anita Taylor, Keri Lynn Doering, Jo Anne Kirley, Joy Day

10 AM - 1 PM

Tournament Gaming
Cascade 11
Gaming
Games TBA.

10 AM - 4 PM

The DeForest Kelley Memorial Blood Drive
Cascade 12
Our annual blood drive will be in memory of DeForest Kelley—"Bones". Please stop in and save a life. Your blood is needed. This is a real easy way to help someone else.

10:30–11:30 AM

Star Trek Costuming
Grand Ballroom 2
Fandom
View this slide show of Star Trek costuming through the years.
Bjo Trimble

11–11:30 AM

Reading: Melisa Michaels
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
Melisa Michaels will be reading from Painted Houses.

11 AM

The Harry Potter Revolution
Cascade 5
Literature
J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter fantasies have taken the children’s book world by storm. How is this good or bad? And how do we take advantage of it?
Duane Wilkins (M), Christopher McKitterick, Lisa Satterlund

Who Will Control the Eyes of the Internet?
Cascade 8
Computers
Microsoft’s Internet Explorer has won 80% of market share of the desktop browser market. Even if Netscape 6 comes on the scene with the latest and greatest, it is virtually an also ran. Where the market is really heating up is on your cell phone and your hand held and there, IE is not even on the radar screen. Come discuss what interface your eyes will be viewing the Internet with, and where.
Jack Beslanwitch (M), Dave Butler, Kevin Kerr

A Blast from the Past
Evergreen 2
Art
A slide show presentation of cool old illustrators and fantasy art. If you think what they do now is great, you should see what they did back then. Wow!
Paul Chadwick

What We Don’t Know About Physics and Astronomy
Evergreen 4
Science
Our own renowned astrophysicist will explain the latest and greatest on the cutting edge of research.
John Cramer (M), James C. Glass

11 AM - 12:30 PM

3-D Bead Sculpture Workshop for Beginners
Cascade 13
Art/Costuming
Julie Hoverson

11:30 AM-NOON

Reading: Robyn Sondra Wills
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
Robyn will be reading from “Reasons for Revenge.” It was not a good beginning. Then again, is there a good way to begin captivity? Lieutenant Landerin not only finds himself captured by his homeland’s sinister foes but the personal prisoner of Suke’s Princess Lorkiff—a young girl being trained not only as a sorceress, but to rule The City of Death as well!

11:30 AM - 1 PM

The Poetry (and Practicality) of Feng Shui
Cascade 6
Poetry
The art of placement and balance to create a harmonious space. Cymbric VanFaulker-Smith speaks of the liberating power of Feng Shui, and how it can help your writing or other creative endeavors. She can also give advice on your writing space. Drawing implements will be available to lay out your study, garret, or crawl space so that Cymbric can make suggestions.
GregRobin AV Smith (M), Cymbric VanFaulker-Smith

11:30 AM - 1 PM

Who’s Killing the Children?
Grand Ballroom 2
Socio-cultural
Columbine, Pearl, Central, Westside, Springfield, Moses Lake. The last few years have shown an alarming increase in gun wielding, disturbed children and misanthropic madmen engaged in mass murders that have captured international headlines. What can/should be done now and in the future to stop the carnage?
Patricia H. MacEwen (M), Craig Figley, A.E. Roberts, Steven Barnes

11:30 AM - 1:30 PM

Dharmic Engineers: The Movie
Grand Ballroom 3
Art
Who are they? Who were they? Where did they go? Gone. Gone to flowers, everyone. What did they learn? Here it is. The movie that will show what it was all about. Not only that, but we have five engineers on hand to let you know all about it.
Ray Pelley (M), Milo Duke, Jon Strongbow, Rob Schouten, Jim Papp

NOON - 12:30 PM

Reading: Christopher McKitterick
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
Christopher will be reading from his novel, Transcendence.

NOON

Creating Hall Costumes That Are Out of This World
Cascade 5
Costuming
Great ideas for creating hall costumes from other planets and galaxies. What creation lurks in the cosmos of your mind?
Keri Lynn Doering (M), Wendy Prather, Lisa Satterlund, Barbara Beden-Hill

Website Site Design
Cascade 7
Computers
Some tricks and tips from those that do this on a regular basis.
Jack Beslanwitch (M), Eric Brown, David Butler, Scott A. MacHaffie

Tarot Cards for the Beginner
Cascade 8
Fandom
An introduction to the meaning of the cards, along with easy ways to remember them.
Janine Ellen Young (M), Dennis Bergum

From Now Until Arrakis Evergreen 3
Socio-cultural
While the controversy over biological evolution rages, the methods, means, and myriad ways in which we govern society has been constantly evolving as well. It was not that long ago when the United States threw off the yoke of regal dominance in favor of a Democratic Republic. This panel will be a discussion of the political process from ancient times to the present day to the far future. How would our Babel of present day governments on this planet evolve to something that would resemble the universe of Dune?
Mona Lee (M), Brian Herbert, Louise Marley, Joan M. McCarty, David D. Graham

The Art of Margaret Organ-Kean
Evergreen 2
Art
Margaret Organ-Kean will show and discuss her artwork in this slide show presentation.

Science vs. Pseudo Science
Evergreen 4
Science
A discussion about what science really is and is not. How charlatans, fanatics, and the sometimes well intentioned use the name of science to push their pills, promote their schemes, or dupe the public into thinking something is based on good, hard science when it is not. Elton T. Elliott (M), Kristine Smith, Kathy Watts, Chris Vancil, James C. Glass

12:30–1 PM

Reading: Ken Rand
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
Ken will be reading from a story titled: “Charlie’s in the Bottle.” Poor Charlie is in an empty gin bottle. His friends can’t remember how he got there.

12:30–2 PM

Alien Artifacts
Evergreen 1
Science
OK, now we are among the stars. If we do come across evidence of an alien race, how will we know? This will be a panel where you, the audience, will examine artifacts brought back from distant planets. Tell us what they are and what is their purpose—if you can!
Mel Gilden (M), Janet Tanaka, John H. Reiher Jr., Anthony Ward

1 PM

Fanzine Library
Cascade 3 & 4
Fandom
The Fanzine Library is now open for your reading pleasure. Come and browse through the collection of fanzines, clubzines, APAs, and other fannish literature.

Getting into Character-Are You What You Wear?
Cascade 5
Costuming
Creating a character to go with the costume you are wearing whether in the halls or on stage.
Betty Bigelow (M), Garth Stubbs, Julie Hoverson, David Bigelow

Our Artist GoH Gets It!
Cascade 6
Costuming
An interview with Artist GoH Barclay Shaw. The audience is welcome to contribute their own questions as well.
Interviewer: Paul Chadwick

1 PM

Neurological Hypnotherapy
Cascade 7
Hypnotherapy can be used from a neurological rather than a behavioral or analytical paradigm. Registered counselor and certified hypno-therapist KinShan explores this area and discusses body-mind connection, emotion as chemistry, how the brain affects the body, and handling stress and reducing fear.

Games that Suck V
Cascade 11
Costuming
Come out, and air your complaints about the games you hate, while our panel drags out the dirty laundry of the game industry. Five years and they still haven’t run out of bad games!
Paul Reed (M), James Ernest

Dune Update Evergreen 2
Literature
Hear the latest about the new Dune prequel trilogy from one of the authors, Brian Herbert.

Living in Space Evergreen 4
Science
Learn how to build a space habitat. Now, how will people cope with living in an environment where one cannot go outside without special equipment? What will be the social rules in a culture where space is limited and the mistakes of others can kill the whole populace?
Christopher Erickson (M), Chris Vancil, Bryce Walden, David Graham

1–2:30 PM

Europa: Under the Ice Slide Show Grand Ballroom 2
Art/Science
A look at the known conditions on Europa and some terrestrial examples known to exist under similar conditions, along with extrapolations on what we might find when we do poke our heads through the ice.
Patricia MacEwen

1–3 PM

Fun with Creativity Evergreen 3
Literature/Art
Turn up the brain volume then put your cerebrum into neutral for an hour of creative exercises. Where do I get ideas? Let it all soak in, as one of our Fan Guests of Honor shows you some really fun exercises in creativity.
Bjo Trimble

1–3 PM

Publishing Online
Olympic 1
Computers/Literature
The Internet has taken over the whole world. So it seems, anyway. Non-paper publishing is a new market that is just starting to take off. How big will it get? What competition will the “e” market give NY publishing? Or will the big houses simply buy out the net publishers?
Dave Howell (M), Kim Mohan, Craig Engler, Sue Cook

1:30–3 PM

Sex: Biology 101
Grand Ballroom 3
Science
Males and females are different in many ways, from chromosomes, to the physical bodies and chemistry, to the way the brain functions. While it is politically correct to think that men and women are identical except for a few basic physical differences, those biological differences are the foundation for many other things, including our social and cultural gender roles. Should we celebrate these differences, or work hard to overcome biology to stamp them out with social and cultural conditioning? What is happening now?
Ted D. Butler (M), Stoney Compton, N. Monique Mitchell, Rebecca Neason, William H. Calvin, Ph.D.

2 PM

Reading: Kristine Smith
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
P.K. Dick Award Nominee Kristine Smith will be reading from her second book, Rules of Conflict.

Filk 101
Cascade 5
Filking
Whether you’re new to the circle, or an experienced participant, come with your questions and comments. Karen Rall (M), Joe Bethancourt, Paul Kwinn

OK, I Sold My Book—Now What?
Cascade 6
Literature
Congratulations—you’ve just sold your first book. Now all you need to do is sit back and watch your publisher make you money. Ha! Learn how to market yourself and plug your product from these veterans.
Howard Hendrix (M), Greg Cox, James C. Glass

A Fistful of Blood Suckers
Cascade 8
Art
Vampires, as they are portrayed in cultures around the world. How they are different than the Americanized vampires, and how the popular vamps of today (Nick Knight) differ from older ones (Dracula, Barnabus Collins).
Lorelei Shannon (M), Suzanne Jachim, Jana Danielle Wright, Jason Carl

Medieval Armour Crafting Cascade 11
Art
Learn about handcrafting armor from the owner of Valentine Armouries, the largest functioning armory in North America.
Rob Valentine

Origami Dragons
Cascade 13
Art
Learn the art of Origami.
Deborah A. Wood

[Ad] Dragonflight 2000

Dragonflight 2000

The Dragonflight Gaming Convention will be held on the grounds of Seattle University from August 25–27, 2000.

Be there or we’ll have to come looking for you!
www.dragonflight.org

Artwork used with permission of John Chandler

2 PM Thursday (cont.)

[Artwork] Empire of the Atom © 2000 by Barclay Shaw.
Cover for the book by A.E. van Vogt, published by McMillian Books.

Violence in Media and Entertainment Evergreen 1
Socio-cultural
Is violence in news reports, movies and games promoting violent actions or is it merely reflecting a violent society? Does fictitious violence make us more violent or could it merely be providing an alternative release for people with a natural inclination towards violence?
Craig Figley (M), Mona Lee, Lisa Satterlund, J.T. Traub, Diana Vick

Embellishment Workshop
Evergreen 2
Costuming
How to add those special finishing touches to your costume. Techniques discussed include: smocking, ruching, cartridge pleating, beading, sequins and stones, ribbon, embroidery and flowers, and trim layering.
JoAnne Kirley (M), Anita Taylor, Wendy Prather, R. Margo Loes

Trouble in Orbit
Evergreen 4
Science
Learn how to survive catastrophes in space habitats. When you have an environment that has an enriched oxygen atmosphere, and you are in a closed container, even a very small fire presents very big problems and a rather large pucker factor.
Christopher Erickson (M), Chris Vancil, Bryce Walden

2–3:30 PM

Artists' Disease Cascade 7
Art
Do you look at a beautiful woman, or man, and notice first how the light hits on hair, costume, and body, and wonder how it would be painted? Or is this just a great excuse to ogle?
Wolf Lahti (M), Steve Adams, Russell D. Campbell, Gail Butler

2:30–4 PM

The Barclay Shaw Slide Show
Grand Ballroom 2
Art
Come, see, and learn about the incredible work of our Artist GoH.

3–3:30 PM

Reading: James Rollins
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
Mr. Rollins reads from his upcoming novel, Excavation, from our Spotlight Publisher HarperCollins. This is a scientific thriller. Dig deeper… into ancient catacombs… something is waiting for untold centuries, the secrets of life have been buried in a sacred forbidden chamber.

3 PM

Songwriting Workshop
Cascade 5
Filking
Bring a song you’ve been working on, a few chords, or just some ideas; and our filksong writers and poets will do their best to answer your questions about the songwriting process.
Joe Bethancourt (M), Andrew Dolbeck, GregRobin AV Smith, Paul Kwinn

A Room of One’s Own-Finding Time to Write with a Family
Cascade 6
Literature
How does a writer, surrounded and overrun by children, spouses, and pets, find the time and energy to write.
Amy Axt Hanson (M), Kay Kenyon, Toni Anzetti, Kathryn Cramer, David Addleman

Pinky and the Virus
Cascade 8
Computers
Will computer viruses take over the world? As our dependency on computers grows, will we become more and more vulnerable?
Ted D. Butler

Alternative Religions
Evergreen 1
Socio-cultural
So much of our culture is inundated with Christian beliefs. So much so, that, during a Middle East negotiation, the American mediator stated to the heatedly arguing Israeli and Palestinian delegates to please calm down and to settle their differences like good Christians. So what other choices do we have besides mainstream religions? What about future religions? What about resurrecting past religions? What about your religion?
Kij Johnson (M), Roberta Gregory, Steven Barnes, Janet Tanaka, Rhias K. Hall

Creating Media Costumes
Evergreen 2
Costuming
Strategies for recreating media costumes. Discussion includes research, sources for materials and how-to ideas for building the costume.
Julie Hoverson (M), Joy Day, Dave Tackett, Joanne Kirley

Asperger’s 101: Aliens Among Us
Evergreen 3
Science
What do Albert Einstein, Mr. Spock, Isaac Newton, Bert (from Sesame St.), our panelist, and the Third Rock From the Sun crew have in common? Asperger’s Syndrome— an alternate way of perceiving the world that is hardwired into the brains of one out of five hundred of us. Come and see if this turns a light on in your life (no we are not looking for converts—Aspies don’t like to lead and make terrible followers).
Barbara Beden-Hill

Terraforming
Evergreen 4
Science
How to make a planet more Earth-like for colonization starting with Mars. What about caverns on planets like Mars? Couldn’t we use natural cave systems on other planets to begin turning an inhospitable environment into another Eden?
Stephen Gillett (M), Vicki Mitchell, Chris Vancil, Bryce Walden

Going, Going, Gone!
Olympic 1
Literature
Science fiction is a field of rich literary traditions, and great authors, but too many of these are forgotten and out of print today. Where do we stand and what can we do about it?
Peter Dennis Pautz (M), Peter Schneider, Dave Howell, Melisa Michaels

3–5 PM

Printmaking
Cascade 13
Art
A history and demonstration of Euro-pean/Western block prints.
Julie Baroh

3:30–4 PM

Reading: Louise Marley
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
Louise Marley will read from her new novel, The Glass Harmonica.

3:30–4:30 PM

Artists to the Stars
Cascade 7
Art
Will artists be needed or among the first to go? Or have we already been there?
Steve Adams (M), Roberta Gregory, Wolf Lahti, April Lee

3:30–5:30 PM

Touch and Body Language
Cascade 11
Socio-cultural
A demonstration and workshop about different body language signals and pleasant, consensual ways to initiate touch and conversation with a new person.
Katrina Barr

4–4:30 PM

Reading: Susan R. Matthews
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
Another HarperCollins writer will be reading her novel, Colony Fleet, which is about a voyage of exploration and colonization nearing the first of five looked-for “waystations” or colony worlds after nearly four hundred years in transit from Earth.

4 PM

My Starship Crew is Naked
Cascade 5
Costuming
Concepts in dressing your starship crew. From creating a theme for your ship to designing the uniforms and insignia. Lots of fun and loads of laughs.
Bjo Trimble (M), Dave Tackett, Jeff Larson, Dave Doering, Lori Edwards

Where Ideas Come From…
Cascade 6
Literature
…and how to get them. This is a one-hour workshop from a four-part course on writing. Come and improve your literary skills by learning one of the basics.
Ken Rand

Creating Aliens for Games
Cascade 8
Gaming
Panelists and the audience work together to create an alien race. Biology, evolution, culture, and technology will be vat-grown for your entertainment. Discuss the factors that go into making a great alien race for your game.
Rich Redman (M), Brannon Boren, Beverly Marshall Sailing, Nathan G. Doster

Biotech
Evergreen 2
Science
What advances will biotechnology bring in the 21st century? Cloning, nanotechs, gene splicing, absolute immunity… we’ve heard the promises and read the fiction— what will be the reality? What changes will biotechnology actually bring to the world as we know it?
Jim Kling (M), Gus Fredrick, Elton T. Elliott, William H. Calvin, Ph.D., Gregory Benford

Grooming the Next Generation: How Do We Find, Create, and Inspire the Next Wave of SF Readers?
Evergreen 3
Literature/Fandom
Sf Fandom definitely (at least the readers of it) seems to be graying. How do we get today’s youth turned on to speculative fiction and build the audience for our product? Learn about projects like Reading for the Future.
Duane Wilkins (M), David Brin, Christopher McKitterick, Howard V. Hendrix, Kuo-yu Liang

Dishing Dirt: Using What’s Beneath Your Boots to Settle the Solar System
Evergreen 4
Science
It’s not glamorous, but dirt provides on-the-spot radiation shielding, rocket propellant, energy storage and more on almost any solid body in the solar system. Discuss how travelers and settlers in space might use this most humble resource.
Brian J. Tillotson

4–6 PM

Electronic Publishing
Evergreen 1
Literature
In the vicious cycle of modern publishing does the electronic world possess any solutions for writers? What are its promises and pitfalls? What will the future bring?
Rhias K. Hall (M), Kij Johnson, Joan M. McCarty, Rick Lawler, Melisa Michaels, Richard K. Michaels

4–7 PM

Camarilla Gaming
Olympic 1
Gaming
Hey, vamp: bite me!
Julie Christensen

4:30–5 PM

Reading: Lisa Smedman
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
Lisa will read two selections from her recent novels, Tails You Lose and The Apparition Trail.

4:30–7 PM

Writers Beware: Online Scams
Cascade 7
Literature
Hey, Mildred! Are you having a problem selling your manuscript? Well, have I got just the right thing for you! You just fork over way more than you can afford and I will line you up with all these publishers who have never heard of me. They will take that book that you have sweated blood over and dump it in the slush pile. Then I’ll ask for some more fees so I can keep lowering your bank balance and…

Our distinguished panel will let you hear all about the latest scams.
Peter Dennis Pautz (M), David Hartwell, Joan M McCarty, Frank Catalano

5 PM

Reading: Steven Barnes
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
Come and listen to this wonderful writer. If you have never met this soft spoken and friendly person, now is your chance. His fiction will enthrall you.

Turning Japanese
Cascade 5
Costuming
For centuries, the Land of the Rising Sun has played a significant influence on Western fashion and art. This panel will survey the historic influences of Japanese culture in historic clothing as well as futuristic visions from anime to The Phantom Menace.
Richard Stephens (M), Deborah K. Strub, Cheryl Glover, Barbara Beden-Hill

Getting Started: How to Get That Novel Written
Cascade 6
Writing
How to get it in gear and get yourself up and running as a professional writer.
Kay Kenyon (M), Lori Ann White, Amy Sterling Casil, Syne Mitchell

What Do Women Want in a Game?
Cascade 8
Gaming
Women are from Mars and men are from… well, something like that, anyway. The point is that we don’t quite think alike and the thing that appeals to guys, as a group, are not the same that appeals to gals, as a group. Our panelists will tell us what it is about certain games they give thumbs up to and what it isn’t to the ones that get thumbs down.
Beverly Marshal Sailing (M), Deborah (Teramis) Christian, Suzanne Jachim

Ad Astra-Homo Sapiens Non Terra Firma
Evergreen 2
Socio-cultural
Humans were created on earth, and seem to be very well adapted to the environment here. How well will people adapt to life on other planets or in space? Is genetic therapy and engineering the answer to populating otherwise uninhabitable environments? What are the pros and cons of messing with the human genetic structure to create different races of humanity to populate the universe with?
James C Glass (M), John H. Reiher Jr, Larry Lewis, Eric Brown

Living on the Moon
Evergreen 3
Science
When and how could we colonize our moon? What will be the hurdles to overcome when we populate our one and only satellite? How do we sneak by the bean counters? Do we build domes or burrow into the Lunar surface?
Bryce Walden (M), Chris Vancil, Stephen L. Gillett, Cheryl Lynn York

There Must be Fifty Ways to Leave Your Planet: An Introduction to Some Advanced Space Propulsion Concepts
Evergreen 4
Science
Science has come up with scores of plausible concepts for moving people and things around in space. What will actually work? What might if only we had this or knew that?
Brian Tillotson

Valentine Armouries Medieval Combat Demonstration
Grand Ballroom 2
Valentine Armouries, the largest armory in North America, will present a demonstration of medieval combat.
The Valentine Armouries Fight Demo Team

5–7 PM

Color Pencil Techniques
Cascade 13
Art
A demonstration on the techniques to use when drawing with color pencils.
Katherine L. McLean

6–6:30 PM

Reading: Roberta Gregory
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
Comic book creator Roberta Gregory will read from her novel in progress, “Mother Mountain,” a humorous look at the darker side of life under a Goddess.

6 PM

Makeup for the Masquerade Stage
Cascade 5
Costuming
Here are some easy makeup techniques that will enhance any stage presentation. Hall vs. Stage makeup will also be discussed as well as applying prosthetics and other special effects.
Betty Bigelow (M), Terri “Sprite” Specht, Keri Lyn Doering

Art as a Career
Cascade 6
Art
Breaking in, making a living—is it still feasible?
Jon M. Gustafson (M), Paul Chadwick, Dennis Bergum, Russell D. Campbell

World Building
Cascade 7
Science
How to construct a realistic alien planet. A slide show presentation on how to build a habitable planet.
Stephen Gillett

Alternative Realities Via the Trance
Cascade 8
Socio-cultural
Carol Duby (M), KinShan

Everybody Kills Somebody Sometime
Cascade 12
Literature
There are rules for traumatizing, maiming, and killing fictional characters believably. Learn the gentle arts of fictional murder from real experts.
A.M. Dellamonica, Joan M. McCarty, James Clemens, Jana Danielle Wright (M)

[Ad] PSFS & NWSFS

Congratulations to the Nominees of the Philip K. Dick Award
from the Philadelphia Science Fiction Society and the Northwest Science Fiction Society

The Philip K. Dick Award for distinguished science fiction published in paperback original form in the United States will be presented on Friday at 7pm in Grand 2. This ceremony is open to all, though seating is limited. The presentation of the award will be followed by entertainment at the Hard Planet Cafe.

Kristine Smith
Code of Conduct
published by Avon Eos

Toni Anzetti
Typhon’s Children
published by Del Rey

Constance Ash, editor
Not of Woman Born
published by Roc

Stephen Baxter
Vacuum Diagrams
published by HarperPrism

Jamil Nasir
Tower of Dreams
published by Bantam Spectra

William Barton
When We Were Real
published by Warner Aspect

6 PM - 5 AM

Tournament Gaming
Cascade 11
Gaming
Legends of the Five Rings.

6:30–7 PM

Reading: Lori Ann White
Cascade 3 & 4
Literary
Listen to a wonderful tale of social satire as the Pillsbury Doughboy gets his. Lori will be reading from “Target Audience.”

6:30–11 PM

Filk Concerts
Evergreen 3 & 4
Filking
A variety of artists will be entertaining you tonight.
Karen Rall (M)

7 PM

Big Furry People: Building Mascots
Cascade 5
Costuming
How to create large creature costumes, and mascots, and how to function in them.
Jeff Larson, Cheryl Glover (M)

Science and the Future of Marriage
Cascade 6
Science
How will longevity enhancement and other scientific advancements affect this ancient institution? We are living much longer than our ancestors but using much the same rules for this prominent social institution. If science and technology put our lifetimes way up past the century mark, what will happen to until death do us part?
Janet Rhodes (M), Bryce Walden, Rebecca Neason

Space Art—A Few Sprits of the Airbrush or…?
Cascade 7
Art
Professional secrets of the artists.
Gail Butler (M), Betsy Mott, Craig Figley

Visual Effects of Star Trek
Olympic 1
Art
Slide show presentation, along with a question and answer period, with one of the visual effect supervisors who worked on ST:DS9.
Adam Buckner

7–8:30 PM

Philip K. Dick Reception/Hard Planet Cafe
Grand Ballroom 2
Join us for the presentation of the Philip K. Dick Award, presented to the best U.S. published original paperback of 1999.
William Sadorus, David G. Hartwell, Pat Booze

7–9 PM

Fanzine Library Cascade 3 & 4
Fandom
The Fanzine Library is now open for your reading pleasure. Come and browse through the collection of fanzines, clubzines, APAs, and other fannish literature.

7–9 PM

Mindprobe Trivia
Cascade 12
Gaming
Members of the Mindprobe staff will select audience members for a round of hard-hitting science fiction trivia for fun and prizes.
Kathie Huddleston (M), Lisa Cohen, Brooks Peck, A.M. Dellamonica

7–11 PM

Camarilla Friday Night Gaming
Evergreen 1 & 2
Gaming
The neck biters are at it again.
Julie Christensen

8 PM

Footwear Frenzy
Cascade 5
Costuming
Creating, adapting, or purchasing footwear that is appropriate for your costume.
Terri “Sprite” Specht (M), Pippin Sardo, Lisa Satterlund, Audrey Schmidt

8 PM

Science and the Future of Recreational Drugs
Cascade 6
Science
Will electrodes replace chemicals?
Brian J. Tillotson (M), Jim Kling

The Shared World Experience-Trap or Blessing?
Cascade 7
Literature
Working in a shared universe can help a writer get started and hone their craft, but does this type if writing help writers or hold them back?
Greg Cox (M), Lisa Smedman, Deborah (Teramis) Christian, Rebecca Neason

Violence Against Gays
Cascade 8
Socio-cultural
We hear about it on the radio. We read about it in the newspaper. We watch reports of it on the TV. Someone has been beaten senseless or killed. Tortured. Maimed. Viciously attacked. Why? Because they happen to prefer sexual relations with others of the same gender. Come and learn what you can do to stop this ugly trend of intolerance.
Alan Fairies (M), Robyn Sondra Wills

Science and the Future of Religion
Olympic 1
Science
Will developments in science and technology spawn new religions or change old ones, or will we, at long last, understand our world enough not to have religions at all?
Gus Fredricks, Janet Rhodes (M), Timothy S. O’Brien

8–11 PM

Life Drawing
Cascade 13
Art (Mature Audience)
This “R-rated” version of how to draw the human form will have artists ready at their sketch pads to render works from somewhat clad to scantily clad models. Diana Vick

9 PM

Reading: James P. Hogan
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
What happens when a Velikovskian catastrophe strikes Earth in modern times?

9 PM

Costume Camouflage
Cascade 5
Costuming
Manipulating costume shape using color, texture and trim to highlight your best features and hide the less desirable ones.
Wendy Chateau (M), Julie Hoverson, JoAnne Kirley, Renee Byrd

Horror May Be Dead—But Vampires Still Rule
Cascade 6
Literature
Horror fiction has slumped badly, but these vampires keep coming on strong. Why do they still fascinate us so much? Watch out! This panel could really suck! Your neck, anyway.
Greg Cox (M), Suzanne Jachim, Evelyn Gratrix, Lorelei Shannon

Alternative Sexuality
Cascade 12
Socio-cultural (Adult Theme)
What do a slip’n’slide, three gallons of baby oil, a midget, a camel, and a feather duster have in common? Find out here as we explore sexuality from a different perspective. Yes, Virginia, there are other ways of doing it. No one under the age of 18 should attend this panel!
N. Monique Mitchell (M), Heather Candelaria, Robyn Sondra Wills

Friends of Bill W.
Olympic 1

9:30–11:30 PM

*Talebones*: Live
Cascade 7 & 8
Literature
Writers who have contributed to the Talebones collection will give readings of their works.
Patrick Swenson

9:30 PM - 2 AM

Stardance
Grand Ballroom 2 & 3
Traditional
Watch our world-famous Opening Number and then get on that dance floor and boogie! It’s only Friday, for crying out loud!
Shawn Marier

10 PM

Gothic Literature: What Exactly is It and How Vibrant is It Today?
Cascade 5
Literature
Discussion about the classic definition of Gothic literature, and how these traditional themes are reflected and modified in modern works.
Rhias K. Hall (M), Jana Danielle Wright, Evelyn Gratrix, Suzanne Jachim

Science and the Future of Sex
Cascade 6
Science (Mature Theme)
Viagra has already turned the American sex life on its ear. Virtual sex on the Internet is rewriting the dating rules for generations to come. How will technology impact sexuality in the future?
Brian J. Tillotson, Patricia MacEwen, Larry Lewis, Robyn Sondra Wills

10 PM-MIDNIGHT

Clan Court
Olympic 1
Gaming
Live action role playing with Clan Burnout. All Burnout members are requested to attend and play in character. Anyone else is invited to attend and join our audience. The story, thus far, can be gleaned from the Clan Burnout Newsletter, The Smidgen, which is available at the Clan’s club table.
Gerald Gieseke, Bobby DuFault (M)

10 PM - MIDNIGHT

Fanzine Library
Cascade 3 & 4
Fandom
The Fanzine Library is now open for your reading pleasure. Come and browse through the collection of fanzines, clubzines, APAs, and other fannish literature.

10 PM - 2 AM

Mars Society Meeting
Cascade 11
Clubs
This will be a combined meeting for the National Space Society, the Artemis Project, and the Mars Society. If you do not know what this is all about, please join in and ask questions. There will be plenty of folks here to answer them.
Chris Vancil

11 PM

Eroticism in Costume and Costume Design
Cascade 6
Costuming (Mature Theme) Examples of fashion and costume designers who specialize in eroticism including Bob Mackie, Therry Mugler, Shaparelli, Paul Poiret, Jean Paul Gaultier, Issey Miyake, Erte and others.
Richard Stephens (M), R. Margo Loes, Lori Edwards, Anita Taylor

11 PM-5 AM

Open Circle
Evergreen 3 & 4
Filking
Come and join friends old and new for an evening of music and storytelling.
Karen Rall (M)

11:30 PM - 1:30 AM

Horror Readings
Cascade 7 & 8
Literature
Things that go bump in the night. Things that go bump on your head. Things that bump your fear level up a bit. Come and bump with the readers of the darker side of fiction.
John Pelan (M), Alan Rodgers, Geoff Cooper, Kij Johnson

MIDNIGHT - 3 AM

The Rocky Horror Picture Show
Evergreen 1 & 2
Fandom
Well, here it is: The Rocky Horror Picture Show at Norwescon. The Vicarious Theatre Company will be on hand to do this live (?) production in full Rocky tradition. Seating will begin about twenty before the witching hour. Be there!
Justin Mitchell and The Vicarious Theatre Company

SATURDAY

9 AM

Tai Chi
Grand Ballroom 3
Traditional
A great way to start the morning and prepare yourself for the day.
Steven Barnes

9–11 AM

Fanzine Library
Cascade 3 & 4
Fandom
The Fanzine Library is now open for your reading pleasure. Come and browse through the collection of fanzines, clubzines, APAs, and other fannish literature.

10 AM

Norwescon’s Writers Workshop: Session One
Literature
Workshop session where a manuscript, submitted before the convention, is critiqued by several attending pros. Norwescon holds this workshop on an annual basis and accepts works, in advance, from all Norwescon members. Information about next year’s workshop can be found in the lobby. This year’s sessions are closed and by invitation only. Presented by the Fairwood Writers Group.

Movement in Costume
Cascade 12
Costuming
In this panel we will examine the way that fabric moves. We will explore using the appropriate fabrics to construct your costume. How to emphasize your movement with costuming. How fashion has restricted movement. How clothing has interacted with structured movement such as dance and vise versa. And how to move and behave in historically correct fashion.
Pippin Sardo, Audrey Schmidt (M), Renee Byrd

[Ad] Eos/HarperPrism

Spring
Eos/HarperPrism

Grand Conspiracy
The Wars of Light and Shadow

Janny Wurts

Two half brothers gifted of Light and Shadow stood together and defeated the Mistwraith. In defeat, their magical foe set its captors at odds, bestowing upon them a life long curse of enmity that has since woven three bitter wars and uncounted deadly intrigues.

HarperPrism

Beyond the Stars
Quest for Tomorrow #4

William Shatner

Jim Endicott has become one with the Omega Point, and has altered his own past. But does the alternate Jim remember the old Jim? When he finds himself aboard the Out Beyond, he meets up with a deep space street gang that teaches him hard-earned lessons about courage, loyalty — and love.

HarperPrism

Infinity Beach
Jack McDevitt

We are alone. That is the verdict, after centuries of SETI searches and space exploration. The only living things in the Universe are found on the Nine Worlds settled by Earthlings, and the starships that knit them together. But if this is the case then who—or what—murdered the crew of the starship Hunter?

HarperPrism

Carthage Ascendant
The Book of Ash #2

Mary Gentle

In a brutal age of bloodshed and miracles, where dark sorcery has extinguished the sun, the fate of Western Europe - and perhaps the world - rests in the hands of a warrior woman named Ash.

Eos

Lord of Emperors
Book Two of the Sarantine Mosaic

Guy Gavriel Kay

A dramatic new triumph of love, adventure and magic by today’s most esteemed master of High Fantasy. The eagerly awaited, concluding novel to The Sarantine Mosaic.

HarperPrism

Fortress of Owls
C.J. Cherryh

A weapon in an ancient war between wizardry and sorcery, Tristen was created to be a combatant in a far older and more fearsome conflict than ever imagined by mere mortal man. And he is about to do battle once more.

HarperPrism

Crescent City Rhapsody
Kathleen Ann Goonan

It begins with silence… a powerful electromagnetic pulse from the far reaches of space triggers a communications blackout. One woman’s quest for vengeance will lead beyond a revolutionary technology capable of resurrecting lives-to a conspiracy linked to the mysterious event known as The Silence.

Eos

The Fourth World
Dennis Danvers

On a planet going rapidly to hell-whose privileged residents spend each day plugging into big lies and shared fantasies-lie clues to the ultimate conspiratorial outrage winding its way from the wealth of the First World through the grinding poverty of the Third … all the way to Mars.

Eos

Singer from the Sea
Sheri S. Tepper

On the seemingly backward planet of Haven, one woman must fulfill a forgotten destiny -something inborn passed for untold generations from daughter to daughter-or she and the planet’s entire civilization will be swept away on a cosmic wave of oblivion.

Eos

The Fifth Elephant
Terry Pratchett

Everyone knows that Discworld is supported on the backs of four elephants who in turn stand atop an enormous turtle. But wait: weren’t there supposed to be five elephants?

EOS / HARPERPRISM / HARPERCOLLINS TITLES ON SALE THIS SPRING: Grand Conspiracy (hardcover) by Janny Wurts, $26.00/$39.50 (Can.); Infinity Beach (hardcover) by Jack McDevitt, $25.00/$37.95 (Can.); Beyond the Stars, Quest for Tomorrow #4 (hardcover), by William Shatner, $24.00;$36.50 (Can.); Carthage Ascendant by Mary Gentle, $6.99; Lord of Emperors (hardcover) by Guy Gavriel Kay, $24.00; Crescent City Rhapsody (hardcover) by Kathleen Ann Goonan, $23.00/$34.00 (Can.); Singer from the Sea, by Sheri S. Tepper, $6.99/$9.99 (Can.); Fortress of Owls by C.J. Cherryh, $6.99/$9.99 Can.; The Fifth Elephant (hardcover) by Terry Pratchett, $24.00; The Fourth World (hardcover) by Dennis Danvers, $23.00/$34.95 (Can.)

HarperPrism
Imprints of HarperCollins

HarperCollins Publishers
www.harpercollins.com

10 AM Saturday (cont.)

[Artwork] Cosmic Egg © 2000 by Barclay Shaw

What It’s Like Living with a Famous Person
Evergreen 3
Day-to-day life can be challenging enough, but how does one get the shopping done with one’s spouse when autograph seekers and fans mob that person? OK, maybe it’s not all that bad, but what’s it like living with someone who has made the NY Times Best Seller List, has a flood of fan mail filling the mailbox, and gets invited to every convention in creation?
John Trimble (M), Jan Herbert, Cheryl Brin, Kate Shaw, Astrid Bear

The Top Ten Ways to Sabotage Your Writing
Evergreen 4
Literature
Listen to how writers can get in their own way!
Melissa Shaw (M), Janine Ellen Young, Elisabeth DeVos, Louise Marley, Kay Kenyon, Susan Matthews

10 AM - NOON

Let’s Make a Movie—Part II
Olympic 1
Fandom
Lights! Camera! Action! Our intrepid producers will be back at it again. Join them as they make cinematographic history at Norwescon.
Leopoldo Marino, Edward Martin III (M)

10 AM - NOON

Masquerade Briefing
Grand Ballroom 3
If you are planning to enter the Masquerade, you must attend this meeting. All your questions will be answered, forms will be handed out to those who have not already picked them up and important information will be given out.
Masquerade Director Peggy Stewart, Assistant Masquerade Director Felice Nightengale

10 AM - 1 PM

Tournament Gaming
Cascade 11
Gaming
Games TBA.

10 AM - 2 PM

Norwescon’s Junior Writers Workshop
Cascade 5 & 6
Literature
This is the first of what we hope to be an annual event. The Eatonville Writers Group leads a four-hour session to teach the next generation of writers their art. This is a closed session.

10 AM - 2 PM

Junior Writers Teachers Workshop
Cascade 7 & 8
Literature
Teachers from around the state will have a chance to learn more about teaching young writers to write. This is a closed session.

10:30 AM - NOON

Barclay Shaw Slide Show
Evergreen 1 & 2
Art
Artist Guest of Honor Barclay Shaw shows and discusses his outstanding work.
Barclay Shaw

11 AM

Norwescon’s Writers Workshop: Session Two
Literature
Workshop session where a manuscript, submitted before the convention, is critiqued by several attending pros. Norwescon holds this workshop on an annual basis and accepts works, in advance, from all Norwescon members. Information about next year’s workshop can be found in the lobby. This year’s sessions are closed and by invitation only. Presented by the Fairwood Writers Group.

Reading: Katie Waitman
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
Katie will be reading from two of her works: “The Merro Tree” and “The Divided.”

Masquerade Presentations that Succeed
Cascade 12
Costuming
Successful masquerade presentations don’t just happen, they are carefully planned out. Learn how to design a strong presentation that satisfies the audience, meets the judges criteria and showcases the costume to it’s best advantage.
Garth Stubbs, Lori Edwards, Richard Stephens, Cheryl Glover, Joy Day (M)

Life Drawing
Cascade 13
Art
Draw from real life human type models.
Wendy Chateau

NOON - 12:30 PM

Reading: A.E. Roberts
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
“The Price of Music” is a Japanese story about an Ogre who wants to be liked by people, and what price has to be paid.

Ribbon Dragons
Cascade 13
Art
Learn to make those wonderful ribbon critters.
Deborah A. Wood

Star Gazers Guide to the End of the World Slide Show
Evergreen 1 & 2
Science
Remember the solar eclipse of August 11, 1999 or this past New Year’s? Looking forward to the planetary “line-up” coming in May or the end of the Mayan Calendar in 2012? Let’s look at the night sky on those dates and talk about why our ancestors would have been terrorized (and we won’t).
Kathy Watts

Autograph Party—1st Seating
Evergreen 3 & 4
Barclay Shaw, James P. Hogan, Richard Hescox, Steven Barnes, Bjo Trimble, John Trimble, James Clemens, Mel Gilden, Amy Axt Hanson, Norman E. (Norm) Hartman, Howard V. Hendrix, Brian Herbert, Wolf Lahti, Mona Lee, Syne Mitchell, Mike Moscoe, Peter Dennis Pautz, John Pelan, Ken Rand, Bruce Taylor, Ray Vukcevich, Robyn Sondra Wills, Joan M. McCarty

Channeling Isaac: Foundation and the Killer Bs
Grand Ballroom 2
Literature
The three Killer B’s discuss their experiences of working in the legendary Foundation Universe. The authors of the latest Foundation Trilogy discuss how their saga came about and how it felt to have a legend peering over their shoulders.
Gregory Benford, David Brin, Greg Bear, Jennifer Brehl

Art in Computer Games
Olympic 1
Art
Talk about the past, present and future of computer art in games
April Lee (M), Taunya Gren, Lorelei Shannon

NOON - 2 PM

Your First Kimono
Cascade 12
Costuming
Sleek, elegant, simple—these words describe the timeless appeal of the practical kimono. Learn the basic principles of how to make your own kimono, how to determine how much yardage to buy, how to lay out the fabric and much, much more.
Deborah K. Strub

12:30–1 PM

Reading: Rich Edwards
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
A reading of his latest poetry.

1–1:30 PM

Reading: Syne Mitchell Cascade 3 & 4 Literature
Murphy’s Gambit: An alien spaceship is found, the pilot burned to ashes. Thia Murphy, a brilliant test pilot, is drawn into corporate and political intrigue over ownership of the craft. These forces will crush Murphy, and her tribe, unless she can solve the ship’s mystery.

1 PM

Obscure Fantasy Art
Evergreen 1 & 2
Art
A slide show presentation by Norwescon 22’s Artist GoH of forgotten, and unknown, fantasy paintings by some of the great illustrators and artists of the last 120 years.
Richard Hescox

Autograph Party—Seating 2
Evergreen 3 & 4
David Brin, Gregory Benford, Greg Bear, Jennifer Brehl, Donna Barr, William H. Calvin, Ph.D., Frank Catalano, Stoney Compton, Greg Cox, John Cramer, Elton Elliott, James C. Glass, Jon M. Gustafson, Susan R. Matthews, Janine Ellen Young, Kij Johnson, Louise Marley, Christopher McKitterick, Melisa Michaels, Vicki Mitchell, Rebecca Neason, GregRobin AV Smith, Kristine Smith, Katie Waitman, A.E. Roberts

Computers as Art Tools
Olympic 1
Art
Can anyone be an artist now?
Steve Adams (M), Dave Butler, Margaret Organ-Kean, Nicola Leonard, Russell D. Campbell

1–2:30 PM

Color Theory-and Practice!
Cascade 13
Art
Learn everything you wanted to know about mixing colors and more!
Gail J. Butler

1–3 PM

Filk Songs for the Non-Filker
Cascade 11
Filking
Have you played your favorite song for your friends or family and had them look at you strangely because it included references to aliens or gaming? Have you thought about how the attendees at tomorrow’s Open Mike session will really react to your spoof of the computer industry? Come and listen to some experienced performers share their own experiences of this kind. Song examples included.
Karen Rall (M), Jeff Hitchin, Joe Bethancourt, Paul Kwinn, Taunya Gren, Alisa Garcia

1:30–2 PM

Reading: Kathy Watts
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
Kathy will read from “Fake Science,” which is a near future story of comet craziness and exhaustion in Lucky Shot City, Alberta, Canada.

1:30–3 PM

Musketeer Battle Club Demonstration
Grand Ballroom 2
Take part in a 17th century battle reenactment as a musketeer, cavalier, or an artilleryman firing a cannon!
The Musketeer Battle Club

2 PM

Norwescon’s Writers Workshop: Session Three
Literature
Workshop session where a manuscript, submitted before the convention, is critiqued by several attending pros. Norwescon holds this workshop on an annual basis and accepts works, in advance, from all Norwescon members. Information about next year’s workshop can be found in the lobby. This year’s sessions are closed and by invitation only. Presented by the Fairwood Writers Group.

Reading: GregRobin AV Smith
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
“Ghosts, Gargoyles, Sprites, and Spirits,” will be the poem read, and filmed, by this distinguished poet. Art by Tim Gillette, for the upcoming book, will be on display.

Harper Eos: After the Merger of Avon & Harper, One SF Line Emerges
Cascade 7 & 8
Literature
The Executive Editor/head of Harper’s sf line talks about the strengths of her combined house’s publishing and where it’s headed in the future.
Interviewer: George Nyhen
Jennifer Brehl

2–4 PM

Rejections Don’t Mean Rejection: How the Writer Can Build Healthy Self-Esteem in a Universe of One
Olympic 1
Writing
As a writer, have you ever come away from the mailbox feeling a bit bruised, if not downright bloodied and broken, with a rejection… or ten? Blythe Ayne, Ph.D., has had hundreds of poems and short stories published. In an alternate reality, she’s a therapist in private practice, and as both writer and therapist she’s had considerable experience teaching and learning the myriad advantages of maintaining a healthy self-esteem.

Dr. Ayne will be conducting a two hour seminar/workshop aimed at helping the writer armor his or her self-esteem in an environment that espouses the word “rejection” as a key concept.

2–6 PM

The Great Space Costume Race
Cascade 12
Costuming
On your mark, get set, sew! You in a room with fabric, craft materials, a hot glue gun, and a sewing needle. Form a team, or race by yourself, to create a costume and a headpiece to go with your costume, to be featured in the halftime show at the Masquerade. Hidden audience judges will give a special award!
Jeff Larson, Dave Tackett, Lisa Satterlund (M), Wendy Chateau, Joy Day, Dave Doering, Renee Byrd, JoAnne Kirley

2:30–3:30 PM

Medieval Madness Cascade 13
Costuming
This panel will feature a wide variety of medieval costumes ranging from period specific and historically accurate, to whimsical interpretations to abstract variations in science fiction and fantasy.
Wendy Prather (M), Barbara Beden-Hill, Audrey Schmidt, Pippin Sardo

2:30–5 PM

Rare Earth or Many Edens?
Evergreen 1 & 2
Science
Dr. Ward, in his book Rare Earth that he coauthored with Dr. Brownlee, has postulated that the conditions that gave rise to intelligent life forms on this planet are a rare occurrence in the Universe. So rare, in fact, that we may be alone. Complex life forms require so special a set of circumstances that it just might be that this planet is the one planet where it has happened. On the other hand, the Universe is a very big place.
John Cramer (M), Peter Douglas Ward, David Brin, Gregory Benford, Burt Webb

3–3:30 PM

Reading: Kay Kenyon
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
Kay will read the work titled Rift, the story of a planet where the terraforming is coming unraveled, and the effect on the colonists who are adapting to the new environment in strange ways.

3 PM

Cross Genreing—Is It a Good Thing?
Cascade 5
Literature
Publishers love to package books with neat labels and categories. However, many books don’t easily fit in tidy boxes or cross over genres. Is this good or bad? And why have genres at all?
Kuo-Yu Liang (M), Greg Cox, Jennifer Brehl, David Hartwell

ASFA Meeting
Cascade 6
Art/Clubs
The Association of Science Fiction Artists will be having an open meeting. All interested parties are welcome to attend.

Cartooning Jam or “Ad Astro to the Stars!”
Cascade 7 & 8
Art
Rat’s right, Rorge! Come suggest silly ideas and watch them come alive under the talented pens of our artists and cartoonists.
Wolf Lahti, Steve Adams (M), Larry Lewis, John R. Gray III

A Good Fantasy is Hard to Find
Cascade 11
Literature
Fantasy books are everywhere—how do you make yours stand out in the crowd and get noticed. What traps should you avoid?
James Clemens (M), Deborah (Teramis) Christian, Adrienne Martine-Barnes, Kij Johnson, Carl Miller

3–4:30 PM

Middle Eastern Dance Workshop
Evergreen 3 & 4
Filking
Learn the folkloric style dances for men and women of the Saudi and Gulf State countries.
Betty Bigelow

3–5 PM

Rustycon Social
Hospitality, Olympic 4
Nose says come and join Sluggo and his pals for a scoop of frozen sweet confection and find out more about their annual winter gathering of fen.

3:30–4 PM

Reading: Ted Butler
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
Ted Butler will read from his works for your listening pleasure.

3:30–4 PM

Favorite Sewing Tools and Techniques
Cascade 13
Costuming
A show and tell panel showcasing useful tools you may not have used before and special tricks of the trade to help improve your sewing time, the fit of your garments and add a professional finish to your costume embellishments.
Audrey Schmidt (M), Barb Beden-Hill, Wendy Prather, Vicki Mitchell, KinShan

4–4:30 PM

Reading: Norm Hartman
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
Norm Hartman will be reading from his short stories. Come and listen!

4 PM

Writing Groups: Paradise or Hell?
Cascade 5
Literature
Writers have to work alone, but sometimes we want feedback on our work—something more informative than a form rejection letter. A writers group is a good alternative, bringing together local writers in the same genre. But not every group is suited for every kind of writer. We’ll get experienced groupies together and discuss what elements make for a good group, how to keep groups vital, and what can turn them toxic.
Amy Axt Hanson (M), Patrick Swenson, Renee Stern, Ken Rand, Ray Vukcevich

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4 PM Saturday (cont.)

How Not to Get Published
Cascade 6
Art
Learn the “what nots” and pitfalls that keep you collecting those rejection slips.
Margaret Organ-Kean (M), Edward Martin III, Lee Elfman

Satan—Myth and Archetype
Cascade 7 & 8
Socio-cultural
The phenomenon of “Satanic Ritual Abuse” has been researched and written off as nothing more than urban legend by many people, and yet the conspiracy theories are still very prevalent. Is there such a thing as organized SRA? Why do we have organized and legally established satanic religions? Is the Prince of Darkness really a bad guy, or is he merely the victim of bad press?
Joe Bethancourt (M), Katie Waitman

4 PM - 5 AM

Tournament Gaming
Cascade 11
Gaming
Legend of the Five Rings.

4:30–5 PM

Reading: James Clemens
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
Mr. Clemens will be reading from the upcoming novel Wit’ch War (Del Rey)

4:30–6:30 PM

Celtic Dance Workshop
Evergreen 3 & 4
Filk
Have you seen Riverdance? Come and learn a few of the simpler social dances of Celtic culture.
Scott MacHaffie (M), Nancy MacHaffie, Karen Rall

5 PM

Reading: Howard Hendrix
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
Excerpts from four novels will be read. These include Better Angels, Standing Wave, Lightpaths, and a novel in progress Empty Cities of the Full Moon.

It’s Not Writer’s Block, It’s Writer’s Empty
Cascade 5
Literature
A panel on the “Plague of the Blank Page” and how to focus (or relax) your way out of it.
Richard Edwards (M), Andrew Dolbeck, GregRobin AV Smith, Blythe Ayne, Ph.D.

New British Science Fiction TV Shows
Cascade 6
Some interesting things, including the recent Neverwhere and Gormenghast, have come out of the U.K. and there’s more where those came from.
Ryan K Johnson

Is the Supernatural All in Your Mind?
Cascade 7 & 8
Socio-cultural
Explore why, and how, we believe in supernatural agents such as Gods, spirits, UFOs, Magic, and other psychic phenomenon such as divination, ESP, and telekinesis. A look at all sides.
Burt Webb (M), William H Calvin, Ph.D., Elisabeth DeVos

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5 PM Saturday (cont.)

Internet Resources for Writers
Olympic 1
Computer
The Internet: information superhighway. More knowledge at your fingertips than what Aristotle had available his whole life. So what’s out there for writers?
Jack Beslanwitch (M), Frank Catalano

Norwescon Honors
Evergreen 1 & 2
Come and hear from all of our Guests of Honor as we give them a bit more lime to talk about their work and their interests. We may even have the potted plants!
David Brin, Gregory Benford, Barclay Shaw, Bjo & John Trimble, Jennifer Brehl

5–6:30 PM

Beginning in Acrylics Demo
Cascade 13
Art
An introduction to the medium with tips and technique.
John R. Gray III

6 PM

Small Presses—Vanities or a Valid Alternative
Cascade 5
Literature
In these days of mega-media conglomerates, it’s harder than ever to attract attention at the “major” publishers. Are small presses a powerful, vital alternative or just picking up scraps?
Lisa Jean Bothell (M), Dave Howell, Johnny Wilson, Pamela Mohan, John Pelan

Rapid Space Tether Transportation
Cascade 6
Science
Swinging on a rope.
Dr. Robert Hoyt

Creating Book Cover Art
Olympic 1
Art
Discuss the challenges and techniques of creating book covers.
Richard Hescox (M), Betsy Mott

6–8 PM

PolyAmory
Cascade 7 & 8
Socio-cultural
The monogamistic concept may be what is most prevalent in our culture but there are other ways to make commitments to those you love. Not everyone believes that you only love, and be faithful to, one other person at a time. Humans have such a capacity for positive emotions. Why limit yourself?
N. Monique Mitchell (M), Edward Martin III

6–8 PM

Forensics & Science Fiction
Evergreen 1 & 2
Science/Literature
A panel that will explore the melding of a very intense, and fascinating, mundane occupation with speculative fiction. Before we can begin to write fiction that includes forensics, we need to take the fiction from the concepts about forensics.
Patricia MacEwen

6–9 PM

Fanzine Library
Cascade 3 & 4
Fandom
The Fanzine Library is now open for your reading pleasure. Come and browse through the collection of fanzines, clubzines, APAs, and other fannish litera-ture.

6:30 PM - 5 AM

Open Circle
Evergreen 3 & 4
Filk
Come and join old friends, and new, for an evening of music and storytelling.
Karen Ralls

7 PM

Alien Poetic Forms
Cascade 5
Poetry
How to create new poetic or speaking forms for your characters/cultures. Diagrams and hands on exploration provided. Also, the use of poetry in science fiction, especially Star Trek.
GregRobin AV Smith (M), Richard Edwards, Andrew Dolbeck

“So, You Want to be a Video Game Designer?”
Cascade 6
Ever find yourself saying, “I could make a better game then this?” Want to find out how you can take your shot at it? We will be discussing some of the more realistic methods, so pull up a chair and feel free to take notes.
Paul Reed (M), Suzanne Jachim, James Ernest

7–9 PM

Masquerade
Grand Ballroom 2 & 3
Traditional
Stunning costumes, dazzling lights, and much, much more!

Doors open at 6:30. Masquerade begins at 7pm.
Masquerade Director Peggy Stewart, Assistant Masquerade Director Felice Nightengale

7 PM - 1 AM

Camarilla Role Playing—Saturday Night
Cascade 11
Gaming
Several RPGs will be played tonight.
Julie Christensen

7 PM - 6 AM

Drum Circle
Cascade 12
I don’t want to work; I just want to bang on the drum all day. Or night, as it is in this case. Come and join us!
Tobin Greywolf (M), Richard Dahm

8 PM

The Erotic Side of Mainstream SF
Cascade 5
Literature (Mature Theme)
Science fiction has long been one of the most puritanical genres, with some very notable exceptions, but the current market shows signs of changing that perception. Come explore why this happening and how authors are doing it.
Deborah Christian (M)

Erotic Art
Cascade 7 & 8
Art (Mature Theme)
Let’s discuss sex in art. What makes it erotic? Or pornographic?
Larry Lewis, Betsy Mott, Spring Schoenhuth (M)

8–10 PM

Aura Healing
Cascade 6
Socio-cultural
Recommended (but not required) prerequisite: Tai Chi. This workshop teaches the basics of aura healing, covers some of the safety and ethics issues involved, and gives some information about energy work in general. It also gives you the skills to continue the learning process on your own. Please! Plan on being in this panel for the entire two hours. Interruptions from people coming and going are very disturbing.
KinShan

9 PM

Reading: Donna Barr
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature (Mature Theme)
Donna will be reading about a murder (?) in 1972 in a WAC Barracks. A fictionalized memoir.

9–10:30 PM

Alien Sex
Cascade 7 & 8
Science (Adult Theme)
What are the potential types of alien reproduction? There are some pretty strange methods here on terra firma. When we get out there, at long last, are we even going to be able to recognize what the aliens are doing as being sexual? Hey! What’s that thing doing to my leg?
Janet Rhodes (M), Patricia MacEwen

9 PM - 1 AM

Laser Tag
Evergreen 1 & 2
Gaming
The only place at the con where you are allowed to draw a weapon and are encouraged to fire! It’s time to get up and get active.
Prudence Bonhas

10 PM - MIDNIGHT

Fanzine Library
Cascade 3 & 4
Fandom
The Fanzine Library is now open for your reading pleasure. Come and browse through the collection of fanzines, clubzines, APAs, and other fannish literature.

10 PM - 2 AM

MasterMix Cafe and Radio Show Dance Club
Grand Ballroom 2 & 3
Traditional
It may already be Saturday night, but we know that you still have the energy to dance the night away!
Keith Johnson

10:30 PM

Friends of Bill W.
Cascade 5 & 6

10:30–11:30 PM

Alternative Sexuality
Cascade 7 & 8
Socio-cultural (Adult Theme)
OK, we explored the realm of “what if” in the bedroom last night. Now we get to do it from within ourselves. Literally. Humans come in more forms than just male and female. Amerindian cultures called it being two spirited. John Varley wrote about multi-gender, switch gender, and duo-gender. Even Robert Heinlein could not leave the subject alone and neither will we.
Robyn Sondra Wills (M), Vicki Mitchell, Katie Waitman, James Clemens

11 PM - 1 AM

Easter Vigil Church Service
Olympic 1
Religion
A celebration of the Holy Eucharist based on Rite Two of the Episcopal Church. Members of all faiths are welcome to come to the service, and all baptized Christians are invited to share communion with us.
Offered by the Order of St. Chiros

11:30 PM - 1:30 AM

Horror Readings
Cascade 5 & 6
Literature
This will be the last chance for a terrifying evening. Send a shiver up your spine and join the readers one last time.
John Pelan (M), Ray Vukevich, A.E. Roberts

SUNDAY

9 AM

Tai Chi
Grand Ballroom 2
Traditional
A great way to start the last morning and prepare yourself for the last day.
Steve Barnes

9–11 AM

Fanzine Library
Cascade 3 & 4
Fandom
The Fanzine Library is now open for your reading pleasure. Come and browse through the collection of Fanzines, Clubzines, APAs, and other fannish literature.

9–11 AM

Easter Morning Church Service
Olympic 1
An Easter celebration of the Holy Eucha-rist based on Rite Two of the Episcopal Church. Members of all faiths are welcome to come to the service, and all baptized Christians are invited to share communion with us.
Offered by the Order of St. Chiros

10 AM

Retro-Future Costumes
Cascade 5 & 6
Costuming
For sheer fun and amusement, you can’t beat the kitchy class of vintage visions of the future fashion. Learn how to make your own classic Flash Gordon, Ming the Merciless, or Buck Rogers. Create your own retro chic and join the Space Cadets!
Richard Stephens (M), Jeff Larson, Dave Tackett, Garth Stubbs, Dave Doering

Being Your Own Best Editor-How to Critique Yourself
Cascade 7 & 8
Literature
Good dialogue is hard to come by, of course, but so is a solid plot and strong characters. How does the writer evaluate his/her own writing honestly? What ways can they use to improve their skills? Come and learn some self-editing skills from these knowledgeable pros.
Evelyn Gratrix (M), Blythe Ayne, Ph.D., Mike Moscoe, Syne Mitchell, Kay Kenyon

Richard’s Panel
Cascade 12
Fandom
This is a fan panel. It is named after one fan in particular, but it is for every fan. Richard Wright contributed heavily to Northwest fandom. We wouldn’t be what we are today without him. This panel is for you, Richard.

Since Richard’s death, there have been others who left their mark on fandom before they died. Some were local and others were international stars. This panel is for them as well.

There won’t be any lengthy discussions or demonstrations or slide show or a whole lot of activity during this panel. What there will be is a place where you can come in and chat with other fans about those who are no longer with us. A place where you can come in, spend a quiet moment, and remember. This panel is also for you.
Richard Wright (M), DeForest Kelley, Marion Zimmer Bradley, A.E. van Vogt

Watercolor Workshop
Cascade 13
Art
The basics of this painting technique.
Philip Wagner

Nanotech and Resource
Evergreen 1
Science
How can nanotech remove the need for space resources? Then again, wouldn’t it be great if we could change refuse into something useful by programming the nanites to do it?
Stephen Gillett

10–11:30 AM

A Trip to Tomorrow
Evergreen 3 & 4
Art
A humorous, satirical film spoofing those “What-will-the-future-be-like?” shorts of the 1940s. Production artist Richard Hescox shows and talks about his work on this low budget cable TV masterpiece.
Richard Hescox

10 AM - NOON

Literary Kung Fu
Evergreen 2
Literature
A demonstration of martial art techniques for writers. Are you portraying it correctly? Does your manuscript read like a black belt in karate or like a really bad “B” movie? Learn what the moves look like to be able to write about them.
Steven Barnes (M), Lori Ann White

10 AM - 1 PM

Tournament Gaming
Cascade 11
Gaming
Games TBA.

11 AM

Reading: Bruce Taylor
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
A one hour reading from his new book: Kafka’s Uncle and Other Strange Tales.

Historical Costume Ideas for Beginners
Cascade 5 & 6
Costuming
Want to do historical costumes, but they seem difficult or you don’t know where to start? This panel will help to give you the jump-start you need! Discussion will include a survey of historical costume, appropriate foundation garments, fabrics and colors and easy sewing techniques.
Keri Lynn Doering (M), Lisa Satterlund, Pippin Sardo, Wendy Prather, Vicki Mitchell

Writing a Successful Book Proposal
Cascade 7 & 8
Literature
Unless your name is recognized or you have an agent pedaling your manuscript, getting your brand new novel out of the slush pile can be an overwhelming task. Here are some tips from people who have been there, done that.
Dave Doering (M)

Illustrators of the Future
Cascade 12
Art
Come and learn about this slightly lesser well know contest from the people who administer the Writers of the Future. Scott Welch, from Bridge Publications, will on hand to explain.
Scott Welch

The Norwescon Knitting Workshop
Cascade 13
Art
It has been a long and stressful weekend. As a little R&R therapy, here is a workshop to relax you. OK, OK, so it has sharp objects, too. I didn’t say it wouldn’t be without dangers. Now, where did I put that skein?
Audrey Schmidt (M), Lisa Satterlund

Phone Home—FTL Communication
Evergreen 1
Science
Communicating over interstellar distances. What goes faster than light?
John Cramer (M), Dr. Robert P. Hoyt

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Sunday (cont.)

[Artwork] MARS Mobile Autonomous Robot Software © 2000 by Barclay Shaw.
Originally published by DARPA, 1999. Digital.

11:30 AM -1 PM

The Dharmic Engineer Panel Part II
Evergreen 3 & 4
Art
The Dharmic Engineers return for another showing of art slides, discussion of surrealism, and answers to questions from you!
Ray Pelley (M), Milo Duke, Jon Strongbow

11:30 AM-1 PM

D: None of the Above
Olympic 1
Socio-cultural
Matter has its anti-matter: does religion have anti-religion? Are Atheism and Scientism really religious beliefs or the absence thereof? There is a growing segment of the population that is treating religion and religious beliefs like street drugs and simply saying “No.” This is a panel discussion for all of us who mark down D: none of the above.
Heather Candelaria (M), Robert J. Grieve

NOON - 12:30 PM

Reading: Wolf Lahti
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
Listen to Wolf Lahti read from one of his books, The Four Pirates.

NOON

Masquerade Debriefing
Cascade 5 & 6
Costuming
If you were in the masquerade, let us know how it went for you.
Masquerade Director Peggy Stewart, Assistant Masquerade Director Felice Nightengale

Northwest Convention League and ConComCon Meeting
Cascade 7 & 8
Fandom
The Norwescon meeting of the above will discuss issues relevant to fandom in the Northwest. Long live SciFi! Be sure to wear your beanie.
Becky Citrak (M), Larry Baker

Norwescon 23: The Poem
Cascade 12
Poetry
Readings of the poems done on site at the Poetry Table and in the halls by the Gorilla [sic], RevolutionaryArmy of Poets, Pundits, Liars and Essayists—"GRAPPLE". Your con character immortalized in verse. Come and hear poems about you performed by the artists who composed them.
GregRobin AV Smith (M), Andrew Dolbeck

Basket Weaving 101
Cascade 13
Art
This panel is really meant for the concom. They will need it at this point. For the rest of you: the ins and outs of weaving baskets by a master at the craft.
Janet R. Rhodes

The Future of Science and SF in Schools
Evergreen 1
Socio-cultural
What is the future of science and science fiction in our public school systems? How is science faring in the schools, what is being done at the elementary, middle, and high school, levels to encourage future thinkers and writers of science and science fiction?
Spring Schoenhuth (M)

NOON - 3 PM

The Norwescon 23 Volunteer Event
Hospitality, Olympic 4
Volunteers of Norwescon 23 only! A chance to see our GoHs and win prizes! Come and let us say Thank You!
Shawn Marier

NOON - 4 PM

Art Auction
Grand Ballroom 2
Art
Time to bid on that piece of art that you always wanted hanging on the walls of your home. Don’t let someone else have your artwork!
Auctioneers: Betty Bigelow and Bjo Trimble

NOON - 5 PM

SCA Faire
Grand Ballroom 3
Fandom
Travel back in time with the Society for Creative Anachronism. A medieval faire in the hotel!
Priscilla Verzola

12:30–1 PM

Reading: Adrienne Martine-Barnes
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
Ms. Martine-Barnes will be reading from a selection of her works.

1 PM

Reading: James Glass
Cascade 3 & 4
Literature
James Glass will read from his new novel, Chuang-Shi, which is the third book in the Shanji trilogy.

Introduction to Elizabethan Elegance
Cascade 5 & 6
Costuming
A great follow-up to Elizabeth and Shakespeare in Love, this class is a basic introduction to Tudor and Elizabethan fashion for men and women and will cover fabric selection, accessories as well as provide resources for patterns, hats and more.
Richard Stephens (M), Deborah Strub, Anita Taylor, Margo Loes

What’s Cooking in Games?
Cascade 7 & 8
Gaming
Rumors and announcements. What’s up with D & D3? When is the Star Wars version of Brawl coming out? Is anyone ever going to make an X-Files RPG? Come and contribute to the general hysteria and confusion! Thumbscrews provided for use on tight-lipped panelists…
Monte Cook, Brannon Boren (M), James Ernest

Camarilla Postmortem
Cascade 11
Gaming
The Camarilla’s Onion (Garlic?) & Roses. How the con went for us and things we can do better next time.
Julie Christensen

Writers of the Future
Cascade 12
Norwescon 9 proudly hosted the first annual presentation of the winners of the L. Ron Hubbard Writers of the Future literary contest. There have been many winners since then, and this contest has become an institution in the genre. What better way for a new writer to break into the market? Come and find out about it.
Scott Welch (M)

Dino Drawing Workshop
Cascade 13
Art
The art and splendor of dinosaurs. Well, at least how to draw them that is.
Richard A. Scott

Humans on Mars
Evergreen 1
Science
Colonizing the red planet. Will we use dome cities on the surface or terraform the caves of Mars? What will be the advantages to Earth with human habitation on Mars? How much can we do and how quickly can it be achieved?
Bryce Walden (M), Chris Vancil, Burt Webb, Anthony Ward, Elton Elliott, Dr. Robert P. Hoyt

Susan Splains' Runes
Evergreen 2
Literature
A panel about runes in magic and stunt rune readings. In this panel we will examine a mnemonic for memorizing rune names, but the focus will be on the first rune row. The first aett will be discussed in some depth and sample readings done with audience participation from the first aett only. There will be a recommended reading list.
Susan R. Matthews

Fanacs at the Bijou
Evergreen 3 & 4
Fandom
Has Norwescon got a treat in store for you! Here it is: a whole hour of fan made films! Included in this showing will be the one that was made in our very own movie making workshop!
Edward Martin III (M), Leopoldo Marino, Ryan K. Johnson

Stage Presentation
Olympic 1
Filk
There’s more to performing in front of a crowd than just standing in front of a microphone. Come and learn about body language, audience repartee, and how to cover when you make a mistake or need to tune your instrument
David Bigelow, Jeff Hitchin, Joe Bethancourt, John Moore

2–2:30 PM

GoH on the Hot Plate
Cascade 7 & 8
An interview with our wonderful GoH, Dr. Gregory Benford.
Burt Webb, George Nyhen (M)

2 PM

Computer RPGs: Will They Ever be as Good?
Cascade 5 & 6
Gaming
How close can a computer RPG really come to “the real thing?” Compare and contrast the computer RPG with the Human Game Master in this session sure to stir up some debate.
Paul Reed (M), Monte Cook

SFFWA Meeting
Cascade 12
This panel is the Norwescon meeting of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America.
Peter Dennis Pautz, Frank Catalano (M), John G. Cramer

What’s Up, Doc?
Evergreen 1
What advances are we likely to see in the 21st century? Was the liver “pill” that Bones gave that patient in Star Trek IV a complete piece of fiction or will we be swallowing nanites before the 2090s? Come hear the answer to Bugs' oft-repeated question.
Jim Kling

[Ad] Talking Rain

Special Thanks to
Talking Rain

2 PM Sunday (cont.)

Endangered Species—Evolve or Die
Evergreen 2
Socio-cultural
Why should we be more concerned with species that are becoming extinct, than we are with the well-being of our own race? Evolution implies that over 99% of all species already have become extinct, through competition and survival of the fittest, why should mankind then step in and interfere with the process?
Adam Buckner (M), James Clemens, Vicki Mitchell, David Silas, Kathryn Cramer

Songs of Science, Technology, and Alien Contact
Olympic 1
Filking
Computers, spacecraft, and creatures from other worlds: oh my!
Jeff Hitchin (M), Joe Bethancourt, Taunya Gren, Paul Kwinn

2–4 PM

Fanzine Library
Cascade 3 & 4
Fandom
The Fanzine Library is now open for your reading pleasure one last time. This is your last chance to come and browse through the collection of fanzines, clubzines, APAs, and other fannish literature. At Norwescon 23, anyway.

2–4 PM

SWOC Meeting
Cascade 11
Fandom
This is a general meeting of the Seattle Westercon Organizing Committee. Yes, Virginia, them folks is gonna do it again. Vote for Seattle in 2003!
Jack Beslanwitch

2–4 PM

Movie Previews II
Evergreen 3 & 4
If you didn’t see them during the halftime show at the Masquerade, now is your last chance. Check out what’s the latest and greatest from Hollywood for this year. Which one do you think will be this summer’s big hit?
Daryl Allison

2:30–3 PM

The Saving of Star Trek and Other Tales
Cascade 7 & 8
An interview with Bjo and John Trimble, Fan GoHs extraordinary! Come and listen to tales of fandom that most of us only dream about.
George Nyhen (M), Kitty Cantebury

3 PM

Scary Elements in Costume Design
Cascade 5 & 6
Costuming
What part of a monster’s look scares you? What kind of fabric treatment or design elements can you incorporate into your costumes to make them truly scary? Find out at this panel as we review super scary outfits from art and film and discuss ways you can add the thrill of the chill to your next hall or masquerade costume.
Dave Tackett (M), Richard Stephens, Jeff Larson, Joy Day, Dave Doering

Internet: Urban Legend Hoaxes, Viruses
Cascade 7 & 8
Computers
There are new forms of urban legends, hoaxes, viruses and chain letters which are becoming an epidemic through distribution via the greatest meme vector of all times: the Internet. How do you detect a hoax? How have they evolved to be more suitable in the new environment? How can we use what we’ve learned to promote out own agendas and propaganda? Is this an ethical form of promoting your own ideas? Jack Beslanwitch (M), Edward Martin III

The Marion Zimmer Bradley Memorial Auction
Grand 2
The Marion Zimmer Bradley Memorial Auction for Northwest Harvest. Please join us as items are sold to the highest bidder to help feed the hungry. Dig deep into your pockets to purchase those items. The mouth you may be feeding may turn out to be someone you know.

3 PM - MIDNIGHT

Open Circle
Olympic 1
Filking
Come and join friends old, and new, for one last round of music and storytelling. Karen Rall

4:30–5:30 PM

Onions & Roses
Grand Ballroom 2
What did you like? What didn’t you like? Come and tell us. Please: it is impossible to please everyone all of the time. What we need at this time is constructive criticism. If you have ideas on how to fix something, thought something could have been done better in a way that you know about, or have any other suggestions on how to improve this convention, we want to hear from you. We will also listen to any complaints or compliments. Tell us what you think is worth keeping and what needs to be put out with the cat.
Cheryl Ferguson (M), Pat Booze, Robert J. Grieve, Terry Halverson, Jeanine Swanson

6 PM

Norwescon 23 Closing Ceremonies
Grand Ballroom 2
A last look at Norwescon 23. The stars have set. The rocket ships have all fallen to earth, but Richard Stephens and Lori Edwards still have the potted plants. Also, hear about our plans for NWC 24.
Richard Stephens (M), Lori Edwards, Gregory Benford, Barclay Shaw, Bjo and John Trimble, Pat Booze, Robert J. Grieve

7 - MIDNIGHT

Dead Sasquatch Party
Hospitality, Olympic 3 & 4
Fandom
Is the sass in your squatch dead yet? Well, then drag it into Hospitality for a last giggle, a last wiggle (or maybe even two) and one more party until we call it a day and send you on your way. We’re cleaning out the fridge and setting out the last of the goodies.
Judy Suryan (M), Elizabeth “Dragon Lady” Warren

Writer Guest of Honor David Brin

David Brin
by
William H. Calvin

Appropriately enough, I first met David Brin on a high-speed French TGV train heading south out of Paris. It was ten years ago, and David was maneuvering down the aisle carrying this backpack. It was huge, rectangular, and black, instantly recognizable as a well-padded Mac in transit. This was several years before Apple finally got its act together to produce a decent laptop, and David stopped to look at my little Toshiba laptop, on which I was writing contentedly.

I could almost hear his teeth grinding. He sputtered. There he was, carrying the embryonic Glory Season around on his back, buried inside 25 pounds of hardware. And there I was, finishing up The Ascent of Mind on my lap, as the train was approaching what, in a jet airplane, would be take-off speed.

We became friends despite the MacWindows Divide. David and 1 were both en route to speak at a SETI symposium. It was mostly radio astronomers. I gave a talk about the evolution of intelligence (it evolved into a Scientific American article in 1994). David, who is usually funny, instead gave them the sobering story of what happened to the Polynesians who had settled on isolated Easter Island, how they did themselves in with environmental damage and overpopulation. He made his recent trip to Easter Island into a little parable concerning what likely happens to many civilizations—and could happen to ours.

David and I, along with an archaeologist from England, usually sat in the back row of the little auditorium in the French Alps and gossiped in whispers when the radio astronomy got too ethereal. It was a wonderful week, though I think David was anxious to get back to his wife Cheryl the cosmochemist. She was then doing postdoctoral research in a Paris lab that studies how all the heavier-than-iron atoms in your body were created in our “local” supernova, a little fusion furnace that happened when a large nearby star collapsed more than five billion years ago. It blew a lot of heavier elements out into the interstellar dust, and that’s what our solar system coalesced from, a billion years later. David and Cheryl now have a five-year old daughter who “looks suspiciously human,” plus a couple of sons they claim not to be so sure about.

The year before our TGV meeting (the acronym rolls off a French tongue as a high-speed version of Tay-Jay-Vay), David had finished his novel Earth. It was full of simulated hypertext links and screen displays. Were you to display it today on a computer screen, parts of it would look like a series of web pages. But 1989 was a few years before the first web browser was invented. And it was a good six years before most of us got a chance to surf the World Wide Web (and the trendy billboards erupted with URLs). Al Gore may have played godfather to the Internet, but David Brin told us all about the web well before it happened. When 1 first saw an early web browser in 1994, I had deja vu—and then rushed to create a home page.

Since the future is happening ever more quickly these days, prophets have to be fast on their feet. David’s nonfiction book The Transparent Society: Will Technology Force Us to Choose Between Freedom and Privacy? came out in 1998, describing the public policy implications of the trends toward webcam surveillance. David points out the important advantages that candor and openness offer to a confident civilization, and contrasts them to the “who watches the watchers” problems that come with narrowly sanctioned police-only surveillance. It was less than a year later that we began hearing those radio ads for a web-based service that would allow parents to watch the daycare scene via a window on their desktop at work. Looks to me as if David’s prophesy about wearable web access is about to come true, too.

The British writer Brian Stableford has a nice appreciation of Brin. “He has shown that space opera can be written with a good sciencefictional conscience without compromising its potential to excite readers, and he has shown that one can bring a similar conscientiousness to accounts of the near future and to social-scientific thought-experiments with productive results.” While I agree, David’s reaction to this encyclopedic writing style would probably be a quip, like the one about his foray into writing nonfiction: “Nonfiction is ten times the work of writing fiction, for one-tenth the pay— and you have to watch out that the characters don’t sue you, as well!”

I hope that David will continue treating us to both his novels and his nonfiction. There aren’t that many scientists who write well, especially for younger readers. While David would describe himself as a former scientist (B.S. from Caltech, Ph.D. from UCSD in planetary sciences) now writing and speaking (and “tending a hundred very demanding trees”), doing science is not something you forget. Neither is medicine. 1 run into all sorts of nonpracticing M.D.s—say, orthopedic surgeons who have taken to cloning orchids or creating speech-recognition software—and they still think like physicians, good at spotting trouble in the making and moving to head it off. Well, “nonpracticing” scientists like David have instincts about worldwide trends that are similarly well-honed, and he’s made the time to write about them.

Careers, you see, are a funny thing. That’s always been the case for writers, but now many people have to cope with several career changes in mid-life, retooling themselves yet again to take advantage of new technologies and opportunities or escape from the demise of older industries. But multiple careers are done “in parallel,” too. Maybe a career used to be a linear, keep-your-nose-to-the-grindstone ascent, but they are increasingly weblike. Majors and minors have become far more common in life after college. Some people keep several careers going at once (though, I admit, one career plus a serious hobby is the more common example—the novelist Vladimir Nabokov was a serious naturalist who wrote scientific papers on blue butterflies). But young people today have some unusual opportunities to have their cake and eat it too, making use of technology to gain nearprofessional results in their minor.

Writing is a skill that is helpful in almost every kind of career, just as public speaking or computer proficiency is, but even more so as writing forces you to organize your thoughts and hone them. Even writing amateur fiction and nonfiction has great carryover, provided you progress to the stage where you discover how to hold your reader’s attention without fail. Getting started on writing has, however, remained largely untouched by technology. Whether you use long-hand or a word processor, getting your ideas in the right order is still the big problem. Stephen Jay Gould, who writes more than any scientist 1 know, tells me that he only writes one draft— that he outlines beforehand, and scribbles a little on the page before handing it to his secretary to translate, but seldom does he do the multiple drafts which most of us utilize (and which technology makes so much easier). Steve still uses an old IBM Selectric (the last big generation of office typewriter, current about 1970). Isaac Asimov had a similar attitude toward rewriting, claiming that in the time it would take to rewrite a book manuscript, that he could write a second book. And he did, too.

But Gould and Asimov are surely the wrong role models for most of us, and certainly for any beginning writer, for whom rewriting is the royal road. And computers now make a difference, enabling you to rewrite ten times as extensively as can the devotee of longhand. I learned to write nontechnical prose by perpetually rewriting a dozen essays, bringing the older ones up to the latest standard when improvements finally occurred. David is at the opposite end of the Asimov spectrum. His books usually have fifty names listed in the acknowledgments, and each reader suggestion likely prompted yet more rewriting.

We writers get into some techie habits that, unasked for, become part of the creative process. I now understand those earlier writers who said they couldn’t write without just the right type of pen or paper. I used to laugh at that, but computer keyboards can also become part of the way in which you think. Yes, David Brin could have written in longhand for that week in the French Alps, but the keyboard becomes such a part of the creative environment that you now have to carry it to the scenery, in order to describe it. 1 was probably the first person to carry a laptop computer down the Colorado River through the bottom of the Grand Canyon (that was in 1984, just nine months after the first Radio Shack laptop appeared; my manuscript became The River That Flows Uphill). I’d already lost the ability to write in long-hand. I’m insufficiently versatile.

Speaking of role models, I find some writers slightly disappointing, when first meeting them after having read them a lot. They’re not as witty and well-spoken as they appear in their books. Sometimes they are quiet watchers, not especially engaging. But the disconnect is all because of what rewriting can routinely accomplish. Do you think of the witty reply a half hour after leaving the party? Too late to use, for most people, but not for you the writer. You just find a good place to insert it into a manuscript. The impression of the writer that you get reading their book is that of the writer at his or her occasional peaks in performance. It’s part of the magic of writing. You, the author, will re-read something you’ve written, think it’s pretty good. (“Gee, 1 said that?”) That wonderment is thanks to being able to select the thoughts of a month and cram them into a paragraph that can be read in a minute. We distill routinely.

David Brin is, of course, the exception to my observation about meeting authors. Good as he is in print, he’s even better in person. You come away with nuggets of wit and insight that keep resurfacing over the next few months. Soon, you begin to pass off his ideas as your own….

William H. Calvin is a neurobiologist and author. He is Affiliate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington. His ten nonfiction books are mostly about brains and evolution; How Brains Think has been translated into a dozen languages. He wrote a cover story for The Atlantic Monthly several years ago, “The Great Climate Flip-flop,” on how civilization is threatened with another of the massive climate flips which happened so often to early humans. As the climate chatters between modes, with abrupt coolings in a decade’s time, there is a madhouse century which destroys ecosystems and agriculture. It’s the subject of his next book, Cool Crash and Burn: The Once and Future Climate of Human Evolution. His most recent book, just out, is Lingua ex Machina on the evolution of structured thought, with Chomsky’s Universal Grammar as its prime example. His web pages start at http://WilliamCalvin.com and Brin’s are at http://www.kithrup.com/brin.

Copyright © 2000 by William H. Calvin.

Writer Guest of Honor Gregory Benford

Gregory Benford
by
Peter Nicholls

Greg Benford is the sort of man you can (and do) meet anywhere. I was not at all surprised in 1997 to run into him unexpectedly while he was holding forth on the deck of the Queen Mary. As he talked with typical animation, in my mind’s eye I saw the Greg Benford I had originally met almost a quarter of a century ago—I think it was 1976— and mentally superimposed the past image over the present one. Astonishingly, he had hardly changed at all from the youngish man I’d met while he was working in Cambridge, UK.

It’s true the greying beard is a rather pepper-and-salt affair now, but he hasn’t become overweight, and still looks youthful though he’s in his late 50s—born 30 January 1941—and still holds a glass of something alcoholic as he gestures, while he talks nineteen to the dozen. His conversation is knowledgeable, argumentative and good-humoured. He’s a good man to talk to (though he doesn’t suffer fools gladly), and a good friend of mine, though I suppose we’ve only got together twenty or so times in three decades. In appearance, he looks intellectual but tough. He looks as if he might have been a sportsman once, maybe a football player, but he probably wasn’t. (Footnote: Greg told me when he read the above that he gave up quarterbacking in Junior High, getting tired of being knocked down, but has suffered around ten broken bones from surfing, baseball, etc.)

Most famously, of course, he has combined two complementary careers, academic physicist and sciencefiction writer. (He must be the only writer in the world to have published both novels and scientific papers on the galactic centre: one of the novels is Furious Gulf, 1994, and one of the papers is “An Electrodynamic Model of the Galactic Center,” Astrophysical Journal, October 15th, 1988, pp 735–42.) But he was already active in science fiction long before either of these careers took off.

Benford has been a Californian for several decades now, but his childhood was in the Deep South, in Alabama, plus years spent in Japan and Germany because his army-officer father was posted there. Benford has a Texas connection too. An interview tells us “I have the weird distinction of having been an instigator of the first con in Texas and the first con in Germany.” The Texas con was the Southwestern Con, July 1958. The German convention was even earlier, WetzCon (for Wetzlar, Hesse) in 1956. Not bad going for a teenager.

Like so many other sf writers, Benford began life in the sciencefiction world as a fan, and rather a notable one. He was, for example, cofounder in 1955 of the celebrated fanzine Void with his identical twin James, at the age of 14; subsequent coeditors included Ted White and Terry Carr. (Carr’s experience here stood him in good stead; he went on to win a 1959 Hugo for his later fanzine Fanac, co-edited with Ron Ellik, and later became a distinguished writer also, and editor of the Ace Specials.) By now Benford was moving westward, and he did his undergraduate degree in physics at the University of Oklahoma, graduating in 1963.

Professional writing came quite a bit later than fan writing. His first published story was “Stand-In,” 1965, written while he was a Ph.D. student at the University of California, San Diego. It won second prize in an amateur writing contest held by the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, but he wrote little more before 1969.

Much of his early work, and some later, was written in collaboration. These stories and novels included some written with his brother Jim, with his sister-in-law Hilary, and most importantly with Gordon Eklund. There were later novels in which he collaborated with William Rotsler, and subsequently with David Brin.

His earlier novels were usually based on stories previously published, sometimes by reworking three or four of them and putting them together in mosaic style. In another writer this could be laziness, or a mean-minded attempt to wring every possible last nickel from previously published work. With Greg, I think the motivation is quite different. He gets dissatisfied, he wants to work out the implications of ideas more rigorously and deeply. Like a terrier with a bone, he shakes an idea and tosses it about and buries it, then digs it up again to worry it still further. Or, as Greg put it another way in an interview, “Ideas come to me in a lapidary way, layering over the years.”

For example, his first novel was Deeper than the Darkness, published by Ace Books in 1970. It was based on a 1969 story, one of his earliest, and also called “Deeper than the Darkness.” When he looked back on the booklength version later on he was dissatisfied, thought it “dreadful,” it was “hastily written.” So he expanded and rewrote it into a more sophisticated version, The Stars in Shroud, 1978.

But I’ve just re-read the original novel, having remembered that it excited me at the time. Sure, there are infelicities, and the ending is ill-plotted and rushed, but it’s still pretty good. It’s obvious why I liked it: it came out in the middle of the rather phoney debate between “hard sf” on the one hand, and “New Wave sf” on the other, and with extraordinary dexterity it reconciles the warring factions. It’s about both inner and outer space. It sees value in and uses the soft sciences sociology and psychology, but it also includes tachyons, gravity waves, and some rather nifty orbital calculations. The story is indescribable and rather ugly—telling the effects of an alien “plague” weapon on a human race, scattered through the galaxy, whose dominant mode of living is a form of collectivism based on oriental philosophies. The plague takes the form of its victims suffering acute agoraphobia, and burrowing into shit-lined tunnels where they lie cocooned, straight from the collective into stinking isolation, and ultimately die. It is a memorably telling image.

Before leaving this novel, I should refer Australian readers to the following: “…my father a truly rare specimen: one of the last pure Americans, born of the descendants of the few who had survived the Riot War. That placed me far down in the caste lots, even below Australians.”

Deeper than the Darkness foreshadows Benford’s later work in many respects: a love of anarchic individual ism which is interpreted by some as a version of right-wing Californian libertarianism (though I’m pretty sure Greg wouldn’t go along with that); a melding of psychological studies (linguistics, the nature of intelligence, the nature of sentience, the function of emotions) with hard physics (Benford’s real-world specialty is plasma studies, especially as they relate to astrophysics, but he has worked in other areas of astrophysics as well); an extraordinary breadth of theme. He works on a broader canvas than almost any of his hard sf colleagues and with more colours on his palette.

Benford became well known quite quickly. After a couple of previous award nominations, he quickly won a Nebula in 1974 for a fine novelette he wrote with Gordon Eklund, “If the Stars are Gods.” This was one of the four pieces that were woven together to make the collaborative novel of the same title, If the Stars are Gods (1977). This first-contact story tells of aliens in our solar system, who regard our sun as a sentient being, and treat it as a god. It is one of the most interesting 1970s stories that use religious themes in sf. (It was around this stage of his career that I first met Greg, when he was a Visiting Professor at Cambridge University, in 1976.)

Benford won his second Nebula, this time for best novel, for the 1980 novel Timescape. It remains his best-known work, and has deservedly become a classic, but I think it has had an unfortunate side effect in somehow shadowing his subsequent career. Perhaps readers expected more of the same, which Greg was not really prepared to give them. Timescape is the definitive time-travel-through-tachy-ons story, and is set in the world of scientific research, a world that Greg of course knows intimately, and he makes vivid use of his insider knowledge. The plot involves a vital, panicky message sent by future scientists to present-day ones via tachyonic coding. The book was so powerful that one publishing house, Tor Books, named an entire sf line the Timescape line. Few novels become logos.

I had vaguely assumed that Benford had won Hugos as well as Nebulas, and it was only while researching this introduction that I found I was wrong. He has never won a Hugo in any category. Benford’s absence is arguably the major omission in the list of Hugo winners over the last three decades. Among his fellow hard sf writers who have won Hugos in the same period are Poul Anderson, Greg Bear, David Brin, Arthur C. Clarke, Larry Niven, Kim Stanley Robinson, Charles Sheffield, John Varley and Vernor Vinge. Naming no names, Benford surely writes as well as the best of these, and better than several of them. (Surprisingly few Hugo awards have gone to sf writers who use hard science, despite the mundane stereotype of the sf fan—the man or woman who votes for the Hugos—as typically a technonerd. This is, it occurs to me, a very significant datum.)

As it happens, I recently re-read the classic works of many of the above writers including Benford (not Robinson and Vinge, but with the addition of James Blish from the U.S.A., and Bob Shaw and Paul McAuley from the U.K.). I was researching hard sf, which I love, despite the reputation sf encyclopedia editors have for being New-Wave lit-loving aesthetes, who wouldn’t know a Lagrange Point from a Punctuation Point.

I have to say that the results, perhaps because I’m getting old, were disappointing. Only three of the writers seemed as good or better on re-reading, and few of their books managed to renew the original sense of wonder I’d had when I first encountered them. The writers that most successfully survived this cranky, subjective examination were Larry Niven (a veteran), Paul J. McAuley (a younger writer) and Gregory Benford (two years younger than me). Re-reading Benford, I kept finding neat nuances and implications that I’d somehow missed first time through. It was an exciting voyage through Benford’s weird but stimulating mind.

The Benford series I had just read again is the enormous Galactic Center series of six connected novels. It consists of, as a kind of prologue, In the Ocean of Night (1977), followed by the series proper: Across the Sea of Suns (1984), Great Sky River (1987), Tides of Light (1989), Furious Gulf (1994) and Sailing Bright Eternity (1995). It would take thousands of words to describe the cosmic sweep of these novels properly; they consist of a swirling sea of characters and ideas, bubbling with manic energy, serving as venue for a heady narrative of conflict between organic (mostly human) intelligences, and machine intelligences. But it goes a lot further than that. The nature of sentience and the nature of the universe are only two of the series' ambitious themes. Benford must be the pre-eminent inventor of aliens working in sf today, and he really thinks them through. They do not just come from the standard alien template. Go and read the books. You may, like me, find them even better the second time.

This series makes utterly clear that to call Greg Benford a hard sf writer is only to tell half the story. For one thing, he has read a great deal, and a lot of what he writes has resonant allusions to other writers. (Notably to William Faulkner. I always enjoy Benford’s public controversies—there have been quite a few of them. But the Faulkner-homage scenario was the most enjoyable yet, with Greg receiving what looked like a knock-out uppercut from ace critic Gary Wolfe, only to bounce back off the canvas and bruise Wolfe with a series of well-judged left hooks.)

As he foreshadowed in Deeper than the Darkness, Benford has continued (particularly in the Galactic Center series) to balance outer space against inner space, biology against physics, history against information theory. If you think this sounds daunting, well, yes it is a bit. But it’s entertaining, too, every now and then to read books that rigorously exercise the mind, rather than feeding it the usual fast-food snacks. This quality of Greg’s writing, together with his sporadic willingness to take experimental risks with ordinary English-language prose, means that he has never been able to seduce what I call the Star Wars audience. But then, where would movies like Star Wars get their ideas from if it were not for the pioneer work of the Asimovs and Clarkes and Benfords and Bears? (No offence meant to movie fans here— I’m one myself.) No, Benford’s secret, and from a certain point of view his failure, is that he writes for grown-ups.

This is a brief introduction, not a critical essay, so 1’11 not discuss all Greg’s books, though I must at least mention a few. There are two good collections of short stories, the first being In Alien Flesh (1986) and the second being Matter’s End (Bantam 1994, but the UK edition of 1996, Gollancz, has extra stories added.) Many stories, however, remain uncollected.

There was much sometimes heated discussion of Benford’s authorized sequel to Arthur C. Clarke’s Against the Fall of Night, entitled Beyond the Fall of Night (1991), and of his recent contribution to Asimov’s Foundation sequence, Foundation’s Fear (1997), when they appeared. I haven’t yet read his most recent novel, which is Cosm (1998), but it has had some great reviews.

It is a mystery to me how Greg finds the time for all this stuff. He does not generally seem stressed or tense when you meet him, and his relaxation can almost reach the point of leglessness, so to speak. He and I on one occasion in the 1980s got embarrassingly drunk, though this—for Greg at least— is atypical.

However, he obviously works very hard. In 1971 he became Assistant Professor at University of California, Irvine. He became Associate Professor there in 1973, and has held this position ever since. This research post is a real and demanding job, not just a sinecure like Asimov’s post at Boston University mainly was. He has also been an advisor both to NASA and to the Citizens' Advisory Council on National Space Policy. And he was rewarded for all this in 1995 with a Lord Foundation award, which is a seriously heavy distinction given to not many scientists.

He has published around 150 scientific papers, which is a lot, and in addition has produced many popular science articles for Amazing (1969–76, and some much later), Vertex (1973–75) and in the '90s for Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine. (However, quite a few of the more recent Benford columns—these have attitude, being simultaneously levelheaded and deliberately polemical—have been more about literary criticism than popular science.) It is perhaps odd, given this rich publishing history, that not until the end of 1998 did Benford’s first nonfiction book appear. It is Deep Time: How Humanity Communicates Across Millennia.

Greg Benford is arguably the premier hard sf writer of our time—though Greg Bear, Greg Egan, Paul J. McAuley and Kim Stanley Robinson in their different ways are up there too—and he is amusing and interesting in person, too. Also approachable and friendly. Don’t be frightened to talk to him. Chances are he will talk right back, and if he doesn’t, well, no damage has been done. He will not be the sort of guest of honor that spends most of the time lurking in his or her hotel room. I like him a lot, and I think you will too.

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[Artwork] Ringworld Throne © 2000 by Barclay Shaw. Cover for the booh by Larry Niven, published by Del Rey Books, 1995. Digital.

[Artwork] Bitch’s Brew © 2000 by Barclay Shaw. Previously published by Advanced Rendering Technology, Ltd., 1998. Digital.

[Artwork] Dr. Adder © 2000 by Barclay Shaw. Cover for the book by K.W. Jeter, published by Bluejay Books, 1983. Acrylic.

[Artwork] Medusa © 2000 by Barclay Shaw. Acrylic. 1980.

[Artwork] The Machineries of Joy © 2000 by Barclay Shaw. Cover for the book by Ray Bradbury, published by Bantam Books, 1988. Oil on acrylic.

[Artwork] Spiderkiss © 2000 by Barclay Shaw. Cover for the book by Harlan Ellison, published by Ace Books, 1981. Acrylic.

[Artwork] Gentleman Junkie © 2000 by Barclay Shaw. Cover for the book by Harlan Ellison, published by Ace Books, 1982. Acrylic.

[Artwork] Back Door Man © 2000 by Barclay Shaw. Cover for The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, 1998. Digital.

[Artwork] Forced Entry © 2000 by Barclay Shaw. Digital, 1996.

Artist Guest of Honor

[Photo] Barclay Shaw copyright © 2000 by David B. Mattingly

Barclay Shaw: a profile
by
Paul Chadwick

Illustrator Barclay Shaw has been one of the leading lights in sf illustration for nearly 20 years. His highest profile in the field was probably in the late 1980s and early 90s, if his Chesley awards and Hugo nominations (most, alas, during the years his friend Michael Whelan had an iron grip on the Best Artist award) are any guide. Recently, circumstance and his formidable computer skills have drawn him to work outside publishing. But the sf field is richer for his contributions.

I was lucky enough to know Barclay pretty well at this time. We’d both recently moved to Connecticut, and were part of a circle of sf illustrators who socialized. Tom Kidd, Victoria Lisi, David Mattingly, Kevin Johnson were also part of it. Whelan came to the summer parties occasionally, as did Rowena Morrill, Cortney Skinner, Jim Gurney, James Warhola, and others. Although a fairly contained man, Barc was the center of the group.

We’d talk art and careers and gossip. Tom and I had a way of rubbing Barc the wrong way with our callow confidence, opinionated views and competitiveness. At the time I wondered why Barc was so touchy; he was at the top of his field, hugely creative, with every reason to be proud and serene, it seemed. Now that I’m in my 40s (as Barc then was) I understand how nervous anxiety underlies every day of this phase of life. These twentysomethings who have it all figured out drive me up the wall. Sorry, Barc, I finally get it!

What I like is the way Barc’s anxieties—his shadow side, the Jungians would say—emerge in his work. Look through his images and see how many beautiful women are somehow being corrupted with corrosion, reptilian scales, hardware implants or other disfigurements. He loves snaky tubes, twisted vines, voluptuous goo, breakage and decay of every sort. He excels at technology treated as an aesthetic object, a reflection of his early training as a sculptor.

His sculpture gave him his first big career boost, in fact. He’d been struggling along with low-level sf illustration jobs. Then, at the 1980 Worldcon, he exhibited a fanciful desk made from walnut and poplar, but looking more like solidified wisps of ectoplasm. It went to auction. A bidding war ended with Harlan Ellison victorious. Harlan was so taken with it, and with Barc’s painting, that he insisted (over publisher resistance) Barc illustrate a series of reprints of Harlan’s work.

A great match it was. The vivid, symbolic images, playing off the titles, benefited from the tight rendering and love of surrealism that are a Shaw hallmark. They properly put across the literary sensibility of Ellison’s work-contemporary, angst-filled fantasy with little reliance on traditional fantasy elements. From then on, Barc had plenty of book cover work, soon from the top publishers in the field.

Too bad there aren’t more books calling for the approach the Ellison books featured. When Barc would do a straight sf adventure book, or a young adult choose-your-adventure title, it felt to me like Christopher Walken playing a role written for Robin Williams. Barc is better employed when illustrating Philip K. Dick (a favorite of his) or a high-profile anthology (like Full Spectrum) where he can do one of his surreal, symbolic montages.

Not that he isn’t a total pro. His women are beautiful, his heroes chiseled (Fabio was an occasional model), spaceships massive and he can do a Whelanesque turn when necessary, blue vistas and Doric columns. His covers for Asimov and Heinlein (which ingeniously incorporated a common central ovoid shape in an array of compositions) were done “straight” and done beautifully.

Several good collections of Barc’s work are available. A collector’s card set of 90 of his paintings was published by Friedlander Publishing Group, and available, last time I looked, from budplant.com. Second Nature Software released a screensaver: “Barclay Shaw’s Eclectic Collection.” And Paper Tiger published Electric Dreams: The Art of Barclay Shaw, which is especially enjoyable because of Barc’s candid and wry commentary. A number of websites feature his work. Start at barclayshaw.com, and follow the links.

Barc is a restless technologist. He devised an elaborate system to evacuate airbrush overspray from his studio (which looked as cool as it worked). Even his palette, I recall, was kind of teched-up: indented reservoirs of paint kept from evaporating by a sealing system. He did Herculean quantities of finishing work on his Connecticut house. He seems to do one major sculpture a year, involving all manner of fabrication techniques. And I shudder to think of what he’s spent on computer equipment over the years, first to manipulate his music, then his images.

Indeed, Computer Generated Imagery has largely supplanted the acrylic and oil paint images in Barc’s professional output. When Photoshop and 3D Studio Max and Electric Image became available, he couldn’t keep his hands off them. It’s led to work for the gaming industry, the Defense Department, and for software developers. And away, alas, from sf and fantasy.

I hope he comes back to the field now and then. But whether or not you do, Barc, the next time you’re doing some high-tech control center plan for the military, sneak in some snaky tubes—and maybe a decaying woman—for me.

Spotlighted Publisher HarperCollins Publishers and Eos

[Photo] Jennifer Brehl

HarperCollins Publishers and Eos

Norwescon 23 is pleased and honored to announce HarperCollins Publishers and its science fiction and fantasy imprint Eos as our Spotlighted Publisher. Harper-Collins was founded in New York City in 1817 by the brothers James and John Harper and was, at that time, known as Harper Brothers. Today, HarperCollins Publishers is one of the largest English language publishers in the world, and is a wholly owned subsidiary of News Corporation. The house of Mark Twain, the Bronte sisters, Thackeray, Dickens, John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King Jr., and Maurice Sendak, HarperCollins is a broad-based publisher with strengths in academic, business and professional, general interest, and religious and spiritual books. InJuly 1999, HarperCollins acquired William Morrow and Avon Books, strengthening HarperCollins’s presence in the science fiction and fantasy, romance and mystery genres.

InJanuary 1998, Avon Books, under the leadership of publisher Lou Aronica (founder of Bantam Spectra), launched a new science fiction and fantasy imprint, Avon Eos. Prior to that time, Avon had published sf and fantasy under the AvoNova imprint. Avon Books, a paperback house, had released its AvoNova hardcovers in conjunction with its sister company William Morrow. In September 1996, Avon inaugurated its first hardcover list, becoming an allformat publisher with a full line of hardcover, trade paperback (original and reprint), and mass market (original and reprint) books. In an attempt to underscore the new publishing vision at Avon, the decision was made to start a new sf and fantasy imprint and thus Avon Eos (named for the Greek goddess of the dawn) was born. Avon Eos has published such authors as Gregory Benford, Dave Duncan, Raymond E. Feist, Kathleen Ann Goonan, Stephen R. Lawhead, Paul J. McAuley, Maureen F. McHugh, Michael Swanwick, and Sheri S. Tepper, among others.

John Silbersack founded HarperPrism, HarperCollins’s science fiction and fantasy imprint, in 1994. Since then, HarperPrism has published a stellar list of leading sf and fantasy writers including Stephen Baxter,

Greg Bear, David Brin, GJ. Cherryh, Greg Egan, Elizabeth Hand, Guy Gavriel Kay, Ursula K. Le Guin, Anne McCaffrey, Jack McDevitt, Terry Pratchett, Robert Silverberg, and Walter Jon Williams, among others.

With HarperCollins’s acquisition of Morrow/Avon, the decision was made to merge the companies' two sf imprints into one entity. And so HarperPrism and Avon Eos became Eos, combining the considerable strengths of both lists. Currently, Eos publishes an impressive list of the best science fiction and fantasy being written today. Eos releases fifteen hardcovers a year (five per season), three to four trade paperbacks, and 24 to 30 mass market paperbacks (original and reprint) a year.

Eos is committed to publishing the finest sf and fantasy, and includes on its list established stars as well as some of the most exciting new voices in the genre including Tony Daniel, Dennis Danvers, Kelley Eskridge, Jeffrey Ford, James Alan Gardner, Susan R. Matthews, Severna Park, and Kristine Smith, to name a few.

Upcoming releases from Eos include major new works from Lois McMaster Bujold, Sean Russell, Dan Simmons, Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman, and Martha Wells. As well, Morrow/Avon and HarperCollins are proud to publish other renowned authors outside of the core Eos list whose work has significant appeal to speculative fiction lovers, including Ray Bradbury, Neil Gaiman, Michael Moorcock, Terry Pratchett, and Neal Stephenson.

The “Eos Team” is comprised of Executive Editor Jennifer Brehl, Senior Editor Caitlin Blasdell, Editor Diana Gill, Editorial Assistant Devi Pillai, Publicity Manager Andy Heidel, Publicist Lindsay Lifrieri, Marketing Director Dominique D’Anna, and EosBooks website manager Hadija Aljuwani. Together this group is working to make Eos the premier publisher of science fiction and fantasy of the new millennium.

Jennifer Brehl is the Executive Editor of EOS, an imprint of HarperCollins Publisher. She began her career at Doubleday, where she was Isaac Asimov’s editor for 8 years. Since then, she has worked with authors such as Gregory Benford, Ray Bradbury Jeffrey Ford, Maureen F. McHugh, Tim Powers and Sheri Tepper. With the merger of Avon and Harper-Collins, she is now in charge of a very diverse line ranging from the hard science fiction of Steven Baxter to the intricate fantasy of Martha Wells. And of course, with the merger, she is in charge of the new Foundation Trilogy, written by our two of our GoH’s, Gregory Benford and David Brin, and Greg Bear.

HarperCollinsPublishers
www.harpercollins.com

Fan Guests of Honor John and Bjo Trimble

About Those Trimbles
by
Lora (nee Trimble) Boehm

By the time they met under Forrest J (no period) Ackerman’s grand piano, my parents, John Griffin Trimble and Betty Jo (Bjo) McCarthy knew that “science fiction fandom” was an intriguing life to study. Bjo started by revitalizing the Los Angeles Science Fantasy Society, and its journal, Shangri-L’Affaires, plus getting a Hugo nomination for her cartoons. John, as faithful sidekick in the fannish film, The Musquite Kid Rides Again, married director Bjo in mid-movie, as shown by the wedding ring that mysteriously appears on his left hand. Together they attended many arcane “fannish” events known as “conventions” and even chaired a few Westercons, Filmcons and Equicons.

My parents introduced me into fandom at an early age, while they originated and directed Worldcon Art Shows. By the early 1960s they had taught my sister and me to sleep in many extremes: in cramped cars with lots of other people and luggage, heading across country to a con; under registration tables; in noisy party areas; in strange hotel beds. They taught me how to collate and staple “fanzines” in uncounted miles of circulating our own dining room table. I learned the grueling task of hanging art show burlap structures—I can wing-nut with the best!

Then in the late 1960s, they spearheaded a brilliant letter writing campaign to save a simple TV show, with nearly instantaneous contact with thousands of fans worldwide. They self-published my mother’s book, a new venue to pass information to fans, encoded in such a way that laymen— ''mundanes" in fan-language—could not understand; genius, pure genius. I could only watch, help, and learn.

Meanwhile, I learned the art of camouflage in inventive costumes, first at “con” masquerades, then in the SCA. My parents made a lasting contribution by instituting the masquerade division system so newbies had as good a chance at prizes as experienced costumers. My father acted twice on the SCA Board of Directors, and my mother set up the SCA-wide chirurgeonate. I learned discipline as a knight’s squire, and as the SCA’s only 10-year-old Princess. I also watched endless hours of hand-to-hand combat, studying every move; it came in handy a couple of times when I started dating.

The 1980s saw all the Trimbles in “clown” training for the Special Olympics, where my sister was an avid—and medal-winning—athlete. Special Friends clown group spent hours in the hot sun in costume and makeup, learning not to think that anyone was too disabled to be “helpless.” These people taught me strength of will and the need to achieve.

My parent’s campaign to save the space program and name the shuttle put us in contact with more fans, while we put our collating, folding, stapling and stamping experience to work on up to 23,000 pieces of mail on our dining room table. Being one of the Trimbles introduced me to some of the greatest minds of our time, met at these cons, or in space groups, and when fans from all over the world stayed with us. Our house was Grand Central Trimble, and for good reason; many a Hollywood hopeful slept on our couch and ate mom’s spaghetti. It sometimes seemed very strange to my friends that I had such unusual parents, but I loved every minute. Now, at the turn of a new millennium, 1 feel proud to have graduated from their indoctrination program, and am ready to serve with the proud, the few, the insane.

Guests

Steve Adams is an artist/illustrator/cartoonist and all around art whore—he’ll draw anything for money! While his most recent pro contract has been providing graphics for CBT’s (Computer Based Training Programs) in the airline industry (Boeing and Airbus), he is still found doing everything from comic books, to sf/f painting, computer art, and is the current art director for Westwind. He has been published by several comic publishers, has several art awards to his credit, and a recent degree in computer graphics and animation.

Dave R. Addleman has sold over 89 short stories. Two mystery novels were published on audio tape in late 1998: Irrevocable Trust and A Contract on Stone. A third mystery, Shy Guy, will be out in early 1999. Two additional novels: The Osmian Search, (sf) and Witch Hunter, (fantasy) are also out. Dave is a charter member of the Fairwood Writers Group in Kent, Washington, and teaches fiction writing at Renton Technical College. He competes in masters swimming and holds a black belt in Uechi Ryu karate. Dave lives in Auburn, Washington, with his wife, Deborah, and his ten-year-old son, Paul.

Toni Anzetti’s interest in biology began at age 3, when she collected a bucket of assorted amphibians and turned them loose in the tent where she was living with her parents and younger brother. In a later experiment, she and her brother tried to raise tadpoles and instead created a jar filled with methane-producing bacteria. While her brother subsequently became a professional biologist, Toni followed the less orthodox path of the science fiction writer. Her novel, Typhon’s Children, has been nominated for the Philip K. Dick award. A sequel, Riders of the Leviathan, will be published in October 2000. She is currently working on Steel Helix, set in the same universe but not on the same planet.

Constance Ash, editor of the Philip K. Dick Award nominated Not of Woman Born, lives in New York City with her husband.

Blythe Ayne, Ph.D., has had hundreds of poems and short stories published. In an alternate reality, she’s a therapist in private practice, and as both writer and therapist she’s had considerable experience teaching and learning the myriad advantages of maintaining healthy self-esteem.

Born and raised in Southern California, Steve Barnes currently resides in the Northwest because, in his own words, “the con dances are better up here.” Author of thirty novels and television episodes (ranging from Outer Limits to Baywatch), he is now working on an alternate history novel, Insh" Allah, which is his pride and joy. His web page is www.lifewrite.com.

William Barton is the author of Hunting on Kunderer, A Plague of Cowards, Dark Sky Legion, and When Heaven Fell. Two novels, The Transmigration of Souls and Acts of Conscience, were nominated for the Philip K. Dick Award. This year, When We Were Real is nominated for the award.

Donna Barr has been having fun at Nor-wescon for years. Some of you may remember the days of the notorious Desert Peach skits, that served both to add to the entertainment at the cons, and to publish her books, The Desert Peach. She spends most of her travel on trade shows, these days, but Norwescon introduced her to the sf/ fantasy con, and she tries to take time out of her busy schedule every year to come enjoy the company of friends, colleagues and readers. A Fine Line Press continues to publish her books, which have gained a loyal and worldwide audience, and won many awards. Her background in languages, literature, world mythologies and religion, history and her original artwork, based on a personal interpretation of classical art. The best place to see her work is at www.stinz.com, or contact her directly at donnabarr@silverlink.net She’s always answered any reader mail. Write if you have comments or questions or to just say “hi!”

Stephen Baxter, raised in Liverpool, has a mathematics degree from the University of Cambridge and a Ph.D. from Southampton. Stephen sold his first short stories to Interzone in 1986 and is a prizewinner in the Writers of the Future contest. His novels include Raft, Timelike Infinity, Anti-Ice, Flux, Ring, and Voyage.

His novel The Time Ships was awarded the Philip K. Dick Award in 1997. Vacuum Diagrams is nominated for the Philip K. Dick Award this year.

Greg Bear is the proud owner of two Hugo Awards and three Nebula Awards. Greg’s novels include Blood Music, Eon, The Forge of God, Moving Mars, Anvil of the Stars, and the second book in the Second Foundation Trilogy, Foundation & Chaos.

A long, long, time ago in a college campus not so far away, Barbara Beden-Hill, an unsuspecting sophomore, accepted an invitation to be transported over the border for immoral purposes. She attended her first con (a V-Con), won Best of Show in the masquerade and acquired yet two more obsessions: costuming and conventions. The next year, against her better judgment, she attended Norwescon 2, and, as they say, “The Rest Is History.” Over the years obsessions have come and gone, but a few remain constant: books, sewing, books, family, books, live action role playing, books, gardening, and books. Barbara eventually got her college degree (science education) and went on to do a variety of panels at different cons (science, costuming, gaming—just about anything they asked her to do). She currently lives in Snohomish county with one husband, three sons, one cat, one dog, a tank of fish, two degus and a mortgage.

Dennis Bergum is known around conventions for his walking sticks, canes, and fantasy sculptures. His sculptures vary from sculpey-like materials to pewter and bronze. He is also a well known Tarot and numerology reader on AOL and the world wide web. Normally found in the dealers room, this year he plans to just enjoy the convention.

Jack Beslanwitch has been reading, writing and hanging around science fiction conventions for many years, involving himself in many worth while projects related to fandom. Recent participation includes being the webmaster for the Norwescon website, the Westercon 50 and Westercon 52 sites as well as Northwest Science Fiction Resources (www. sfnorthwest.org), the Northwest Science Fiction Society (www.nwsfs.org) and forwriters.com (www.forwriters.com) a site for writers that also includes Writers Notebook and Writers Workbook. He is the founder of the Seattle HTML SIG (www.halcyon.com/seasigi/html.html) and while not chasing around conventions, he is running his own web design business, Web Witchery Consulting (www.webwitch.com). He is also the bid chair for bringing Westercon 56 to western Washington in 2003 (www.webwitch. com/westercon56).

Joe Bethancourt was raised mostly in the Southern Appalacians, in North Carolina, and absorbed the music almost from the time he could walk.

He began learning banjo at age 9, after he heard his grandfather, C.H. Burnett, playing fiddle. His first banjo was given to him by his grandfather. When his family moved to Phoenix in 1961, Joe began learning guitar, hanging around coffeehouses, mariachi bands, bluegrass groups, and a place called “J.D.’s,” where he would sneak in to listen to a local guy called Waylon Jennings. He has worked as a pro musician since 1964. He plays, at current count, over 64 different stringed instruments, both modern and medieval, and is a walking library of traditional American and Irish music.

Joe was introduced to hiking by Bjo Trimble, who knew him from his activities within the SCA. Joe is known in the SCA as “Joseph of Locksley,” and his CD with Leslie Fish, Serious Steel, is a best seller in that group.

Joe’s tape of the songs from Manly Wade Wellman’s “Silver John” stories, called Who Fears the Devil, is an acknowledged masterwork. Joe is also a fan of H.P. Lovecraft, and operates the famed “Campus Crusade for Cthulhu” web page.

Bon vivant, raconteur, woman about town, and evil sword wielding dominatrix of the pesky space time continuum, Betty Bigelow is an old fan (119 and counting) best known for her award-winning costuming and her singing and dancing Klingon halftime reviews.

Betty is also an artist (under the nom de paintbrush of Rena Bassilvergoran) who works in a variety of media. She has also studied belly dance, flamenco, and Middle Eastern ethnic dance for 27 years. She is artistic director of Shahrazad Middle Eastern Dance Ensemble.

Dave Bigelow is a writer of science fiction short stories. He belongs to the Seattle writers group known as “The Ink Slingers,” and had a story included in the 1994 Worldcon (Winnipeg) program book.

Lisa Jean Bothell has been involved with independent publishing since the publication of her first science fiction novel, Nashramh: The Red Thread in 1984. She also authored Nashramh: The Blue Thread, and co-authored two more Nashramh novels with local Seattle authors. She has had numerous short stories and articles published in Horrors! 365 Scary Stories, Speculations, The Urbanite, Heart Attack, Neophyte, Scavenger’s Newsletter, and The Magic Within. In 1991, Lisa developed the quarterly Heliocentric Net Magazine which she turned into the Heliocentric Net/STIG-MATA Anthology (currently on hiatus); she also created and now edits the bimonthly Writer’s Network newsletter. She is currently studying graphic design and will pursue illustration in addition to writing.

Brannon Boren has been a free-lance writer in the RPG industry since 1991. Growing up in the shadow of Saturn V rockets in Cape Canaveral gave him a healthy interest in science and science fiction which soon spread to comic books and role playing games. If diagnosed early he might have been helped. Although he claims that he has a life, and is not a geek, chances are that he really doesn’t, and really is.

Born in Seattle, Adam Buckner has spent the last six years in Hollywood creating visual effects for film and television. He was nominated for the Emmy Awards for his work on the final episode of the Star Trek series Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. Adam has also won the International Monitor Award for Best Visual Effects on the Deep Space Nine episode “A Call to Arms,” the season finale during his first year at Paramount Pictures. Other credits include such shows as Babylon 5, Xena, Hercules, and Legend.

Gail J. Butler was born in Marin County, California (an Air Farce—er—Air Force brat). She moved involuntarily from coast to coast with her family until they settled in Cheney, Washington in 1962. Gail escaped from Cheney in 1983 and now lives in Everett with Theo Williams, Rustycon’s former chief vidiot. Gail describes herself as a “biophile and frustrated technophile” (in other words, she domesticates any passing life-form and wishes she had better techno-toys). Best known for the “Embassy” series of fantasy paintings, Gail has illustrated for Analog and MZB’s Fantasy Magazine (including the cover of issue 14). In her theoretical free time, she’s Jewish-mother-by-default to much of Northwest art-fandom.

Ted D. Butler is an emerging technology analyst and computer virus specialist who has had several short stories published. His first novel won an award at the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Conference. A second novel is in the works.

William H. Calvin, Ph.D., is the author of ten nonfiction books on brains and evolution, including How Brains Think. He is a theoretical neurobiologist on the faculty of the University of Washington. He is the author of The Atlantic Monthly cover story, “The Great Climate Flip-flop,” on abrupt changes in the earth’s climate. He is a science advisor to the forthcoming NOVA TV series, Evolution, and a member of the Board of Advisors to the Foundation for the Future.

Growing up, Russell D. Campbell always liked to doodle. His mother recently gave him a drawing he did in 3rd grade of a manned landing on Mars! It’s raw looking but somehow he never stopped being creative. Maybe that means he hasn’t “grown up?” He started showing his art to the public with a Christmas card of a dragon in a Santa suit. He followed that with participation in a convention show in 1988. After that, all manner of oddities spewed from his imagination.

Best known, thus far, for his pen and ink work, Russ also works in other media. His work is fanciful, often humorous, usually fantasy oriented. Just for good measure he occasionally lets a nightmare escape his mind onto paper as well. He also does various needle crafts, loves to cook, and works full-time as a professional web developer. He recently finished a master of science degree in applied information management.

At conventions you may find him giving demos, wandering the dealers room or art show, or several other places. And if, in the evening, you see a fellow with a grey goatee, somewhat resembling a musketeer, carrying a large blue-ish drinking horn… say “hi!” and join him in the search for truth (or ale).

Amy Sterling Casil’s fiction has appeared in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Zoetrope: Allstory, the Writers of the Future anthologies, Talebones and Pulp Eternity. She has been an active member of Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America since 1995.

She is a 1984 graduate of the prestigious Clarion Science Fiction Writers Workshop. She has written hundreds of articles on writing and literature in dozens of publications. She currently writes and edits the monthly Science Fiction and Fantasy market newsletter for Writers Club on the web (http://www.iuniverse.com).

Her short fiction has received Nebula Award recommendations and Honorable Mentions in the Year’s Best Science Fiction and the Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror anthologies. She is the only four-time finalist and one-time winner in the Writers of the Future contest.

She teaches writing and literature at UC Riverside and Chapman University in addition to various online courses through Writers Club and NovelAdvice.com.

Author Dave Wolverton has called her work “powerful” and “compelling.” Her friend and mentor, World Fantasy Awardwinning novelist James Blaylock said, “I’ve been a professional writer myself for over twenty years, but I’d be happy to take a creative writing class if Amy were the teacher.”

Frank Catalano has a diverse background in writing and technology. A veteran technology strategist and analyst, Frank has advised many top-tier companies on business and Internet strategy over the past decade, including McGraw-Hill, PC Data, Apple Computer, Silicon Graphics, and several others. He has been an executive at Seattle-based Internet start-up iCopyright.com and held management positions at Egghead Software and the Apple Programmers and Developers Association.

In addition to consulting, he currently is Tech Editor for KCPQ-TV 13 Fox Seattle, providing tech industry commentary and analysis in regular segments on both Q13 Reports@Ten and Mornings Live on Q.

Frank wrote the popular “Byte Me” columns for more than four years in Seattle Weekly and Eastsideweek. His essays have appeared in Orange County Weekly, Minneapolis City Pages, ClickZ, Omni, The Seattle Times, Windows Watcher, Computer Retail Week, Inside Multimedia, and many others. He’s also the co-author of Marketing Online for Dummies, published in 1998.

Prior to working in the technology industry, Frank was a broadcast news reporter and anchor for a dozen years, including a long-term stint with King Broadcasting in Seattle, where his work received several United Press International, Associated Press, and Society of Professional Journalists honors. He also was an active science fiction writer in the 1980s, with work appearing in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Analog, Amazing, and Omni, and he served as secretary for the Science Fiction Writers of America.

He can be reached at frank@frankcatalano.com.

Paul Chadwick grew up in Bellevue, WA. His early cartoons appeared in fanzines including Science Fiction Review. He majored in illustration at Art Center College of Design. Afterwards, he drew movie storyboards for Disney, Lucasfilm and other studios; painted advertising posters for films and book covers for Jack Vance, Tanith Lee, Gordon Dickson and many others; and served as production designer for the film After Midnight. He’s best known for his comics series Concrete, winner of many awards and currently being developed as a film by Disney Studios. His comics series The World Below, sf adventure set in the strange, vast world beneath Washington state, concludes this month, and he is now working on new Concrete projects. He now lives in the San Juans, but knew Artist Guest Barclay Shaw pretty well when they both lived in Connecticut.

Starting out in life by jumping out of top hats, and having her head cut off repeatedly (super glue was a must in her family) and also disappearing as if by magic, has given Wendy Chauteau a unique outlook on life. The daughter of stage magicians prompted her to look at life, as well as clothing, differently. Watching stage shows as a child, she yearned to make that unique and feathery costume style her life. As a Master class costumer in Norwescon, she has left enough feathers around the halls to have some people come up with feather masks made from her moltings. She has chaired Rustycon twice and has been on the Board of Directors for the same convention. Now, as an artist, she has taken a unique attitude towards life, doing henna body painting, canvas work, designing, painting longhorn steer horns, and making a wonderful drinking horn using lions, tigers, dragons and all sort of real and mythical creatures. In asking a friend (Sheila Green) about her, Sheila replied with a few comments: L Manages to entice unsuspecting souls to fandom. (giggle); 2. One helluva great friend; 3. Sexiest smile; 4. Extensive sf video collection that helps to lure unsuspecting souls to fandom; 5. Raised a very beautiful, talented daughter; 6. Can be a Power Ranger when called upon. (“I know, I’ve seen her in action”); 7. Can throw together a fantastic winning costume with scraps of material laying around the house (so that’s what she did with the old kitchen sink!); 8. “The most fun I’ve ever had in my life was living next door to Wendy. She opened up a new world for me and I’m forever in her debt (yes, I am one of many unsuspecting souls)”. Wendy lives in Everett with her husband Frank, 2 dogs and 9 cats.

Teramis is a writer of erotica, a public speaker and BDSM essayist active in the leather and alternative life-style communities in San Francisco. Published under the name of Deborah Christian, she has authored Mainline, Kar Kalim, and The Truthsayer’s Apprentice, and is presently working on the second book of the Loregiver series. She is a former role playing game designer, an Army vet, and an occasional systems consultant when supporting her writing habit. She is involved in a new art foundation and creative projects that present positive portrayals of leatherfolk.

James Clemens was born in Chicago, Illinois, in 1961. With his three brothers and three sisters, he was raised in the Midwest and rural Canada. There, he explored cornfields, tadpoles, and frozen ponds, dreaming of worlds and adventures beyond the next bend in the creek.

Eventually, forced to grow up, he went to school at the University of Missouri where he graduated with a doctorate in veterinary medicine in 1985. Presently, he shares his home with two Dalmatians, a stray Shepherd, and a love-sick parrot named Igor.

Wit’ch Fire, was his first novel, followed by Wit’ch Storm and the upcoming novel, Wit’ch War. He is currently hard at work on the fourth installment of his fantasy series.

James Clemens also writes a series of sci-entific/archaeological thrillers under the penname “James Rollins.” These novels include Subterranean, and this upcoming summer’s Excavation.

Lisa R. Cohen’s fiction has appeared in Pulphouse, F&SF, Story and Realms of Fantasy and has received honorable mentions in the Year’s Best SF and Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror anthologies. She has written book reviews for the online magazine Science Fiction Weekly and trivia games for SciFi channel’s Mindprobe. Her current fascinations include professional wrestling, knitting, filmmaking, cooperative publishing, throat-singing, and pornography.

Stoney Compton, a new resident of Washington state, is a visual information specialist for NOAA in Seattle. He spent three decades in Alaska before finally tiring of winter. He has had three short works see print and currently is flogging asf novella and an historical novel.

Amazing Stories Managing Editor Sue Weinlein Cook handles day-to-day operations for the magazine, including working with shared-world licensors and developing authors. After several newspaper jobs, she decided she didn’t really want to become Lois Lane and instead went on to work in book publishing for TSR, Inc. and as an editor and later creative director of Dragonlance role playing games. In addition to her role with Amazing Stories, she also serves as content manager of the Wiz-ards of the Coast website (www. wizards.com) and has had several short stories published.

Monte Cook started working professionally in the game industry in 1988. In the employ of Iron Crown Enterprises, he worked with the Rolemaster and Champions games as an editor, developer, and designer. In 1994, Monte went to work for TSR as a game designer. Now a senior game designer with Wizards of the Coast, he has just completed the new Dungeon Master’s Guide for the third edition of Dungeon’s and Dragons. A graduate of Clarion West Writers' Workshop, Monte has also had short stories published and a novel, The Glass Prison. He is working on a new novel to be published next year. In his spare time, he runs anywhere from one to three games per week, holds a yearly game convention at his house, builds vast dioramas out of Lego building bricks, and reads a lot of comics.

Greg Cox is the author of numerous media tie-in books, including Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Q Continuum, X-men/ Avengers: Gamma Quest, and Battle On!: An Unauthorized, Irreverent Look At Xena: Warrior Princess. His most recent Star Trek story appears in the current issue of Amazing Stories magazine, and the third book in his Gamma Quest trilogy will see print (finally!) in June 2000.

A veteran of the Clarion West science fiction writing workshop, Greg now lives in New York City, where he works as a Consulting Editor for Tor Books.

John Cramer’s latest hard sf novel Einstein’s Bridge (Avon, 1997) is now available as a $3.99 Avon paperback. It’s about particle physics, wormholes, alien contact, time travel, and the killing of the Superconducting Supercollider project. John’s first hard sf novel Twistor (Morrow, 1989), also out as a new Avon paperback, twice earned him John W. Campbell Award nominations as best new sf writer. Since 1984 he has written the bimonthly science-fact column, “The Alternate View” for Analog Science Fiction/Fact and recently submitted his 102nd column.

John is a Professor of physics at the University of Washington in Seattle, where he leads a research program in ultra-relativistic heavy ion physics, participating in experiments at the CERN in Geneva, Switzerland and Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, NY. His work on the transactional interpretation of quantum mechanics (see http://www.npl. washington.edu/ti) was featured in John Gribbin’s 1995 science-fact book Schroedinger’s Kittens and Paul Preuss' recent sf novel Secret Passages. John also works in high-energy astrophysics. Reprints of John’s Analog columns and selected physics publications, as well as information about his novels, can be found at his web site at http://faculty. washington.edu/jcramer.

Kathryn Cramer is a writer and anthologist presently doing website design. She won a World Fantasy Award for best anthology for The Architecture of Fear co-ed-ited with Peter Pautz; she was nominated for a World Fantasy Award for her anthology, Walls of Fear. She co-edited several anthologies of Christmas and fantasy stories with David G. Hartwell but her most recent book is a huge anthology of hard sf, The Ascent of Wonder, co-edited with David G. Hartwell. She was a runner-up for the Pioneer Award for best essay on sf of the year, and is on the editorial board of The New York Review of Science Fiction, of which she is also the Art Director. Her dark fantasy hypertext, In Small and Large Pieces, was published by Eastgate Systems, Inc. She was named on a list of the 50 most important people in hypertext/electronic literature. She lives in Pleasantville, NY where in 1997 she became the mother of Peter Henry Cramer Hartwell.

Joy Day is a professional artist specializing in landscape, astronomy, science fiction and fantasy painting. She is represented in galleries internationally and her work has been published on CD-ROMs, prints, bookmarks, postcards and notecards. Although she has a fine arts degree from Purdue University, she is entirely self taught in her painting technique of reverse painting on glass.

Her glass technique produces vibrant, brilliant eye-catching works by the dangerously delicate art of painting directly onto the underside of a sheet of glass, instead of onto the front of paper or canvas. Multiple layers of glass are sometimes used to achieve added depth, gold leaf for iridescence and vibrancy and esoteric materials for texture and translucence. Shards of glass, razor blades, ice picks and scalpels transform otherwise flat colors into intriguing texture and detail. Portions of paintings are even set on fire, producing dramatic results—and a great whooshing sound.

She has won awards for her stunning artworks and has been invited coast to coast to give presentations and demonstrations of this rare technique.

A.M. Dellamonica has been a rape crisis worker, theater technician, piccolo diva, burglar alarm monitor, guerilla secretary and actor. A resident of Vancouver, BC, where she lives with the most wonderful woman in the world, she is a member of the Fangs of God writer’s workshop. She is also a student of ki aikido.

Current grooves include the history of Quebec, medical trivia and epidemiology. She is at work on a novel and her most recent appearances in print have been in Realms of Fantasy and the Best of Crank! anthology.

Elisabeth DeVos left high school to become a ballerina, left dance to get a computer science degree, and left software engineering to write uncategorizable science fiction/fantasy. Her debut novel, The Seraphim Rising, draws on her experiences growing up amid Central Florida’s amusement parks, space shuttles, and mammoth churches. Recently she made her first short fiction sale to Talebones. Several years before that, Elisabeth and her husband escaped the sunshine, tourists and humidity by moving to the Seattle area, where she is now at work on her second novel.

Photo © 1999 by Dominic Bonuccelli

David Doering is a free-lance journalist in the computer industry. He’s been an editor of a regional sf magazine, three-time chair of Provo’s annual con, twenty-year fan of conventions, Head of the Utah Costumers Guild, president of TechVoice (a communications consulting firm), and has had every story he’s ever submitted published. His most recent fiction has appeared in the anthology Washed by a Wave of Wind.

Keri Lyn Doering is a noted costumer who has won awards at every level: here at Norwescon, regional conventions and finally at Worldcon. Her first costume appeared at the San Francisco Worldcon (1993), which she entered only because no one ever told her how difficult it was to compete at that level. She is currently president of the Utah Costumers Guild. Keri runs her own costuming, quilting and sewing business in Utah.

Guerilla poet, playwright and storyteller, Andrew Dolbeck has been active at Norwescon for many years. He has written six full-length plays, and many shorter ones, usually with fantasy or historical themes. Many of his plays have been produced locally on a semi-professional level. He has also acted and directed in community theater productions, and has told stories (both his own and folktales) professionally. For his most recent trick, he has managed the poetic and scripting arts to write his most recent play, Love Amongst the Lost, entirely in verse.

Nathan G. Doster has been active as an educator, writer and game designer. He has contributed to collectible card games, miniatures and board games, and computer game designs. He is currently living on the central coast of California and working on the sequel to the game The Quest for Piptwynn’s Scroll, and the book Boonya’s Epic Adventure.

Richard A. Edwards, also known as Sir Richard Fitzalan, Baron in the Society for Creative Anachronism has been writing poetry in many historical forms for several years and has published two chapbooks of his poems. In addition to various newsletters published by several branches of the Society for Creative Anachronism, the nationally known Renaissance Magazine has also published several of his poems.

Professionally he is a librarian and researcher. His web site for The Ella Wheeler Wilcox Society (a Victorian-era American poet) at: http://192.211.16.13/individu-als/edwardsr/ella/ellahome.htm is internationally recognized.

His personal poetry web page is located at: http://192.211.16.13/individuals/ edwardsr/poetry.htm

Milo Duke has been an artist working in the Northwest for over 20 years. He has exhibited in galleries and museums regionally and nationally, and his work has appeared on program, magazine, book, and CD covers. He was a founding member of the Dharmic Engineers. In Seattle, he is represented by the Davidson Galleries, and he is currently an instructor of painting at the Academy of Realist Art. His most recent work is the “Book of Orpheus,” a graphic novelette in woodcuts. Excerpts of his works in progress can be seen at his web site, “Milo Duke’s Library of Alexandria,” www.halcyon.com/ mduke/.

Lee Elfman is a multitalented artist and writer, working in a variety of mediums. She holds degrees in graphic arts, multimedia design, and is currently pursuing a bachelor’s degree in liberal arts. She is the lead CGI artist for a local movie production company. Her art includes colored pencil, pen and ink, and painting in various styles. She is primarily a computer animation artist, having produced numerous shorts, special effects, and several children’s games. She is also a fanzine writer and plays electric bass on the side. She met her husband through the con circuit and was married in a Klingon ceremony—the bride’s dowry was 500 gold-wrapped chocolate bars! She has a wicked sense of humor and an excellent set of ears, so if you’re not careful about what you say and do around her, you just might end up as a parody in one of her drawings or animation pieces. So warns The Elf!

Since January 1996 Elton Elliott has served as Chairman, President, and cofounder of VA Technologies, Inc., a company specializing in digital projection systems for the entertainment industry.

Elton, a former magazine publisher and editor, is a novelist, anthologist, essayist, poet, playwright, lecturer, and public relations consultant, whose work has been featured or mentioned in publications ranging from Amazing Stories to Scientific American.

He served as editor for his latest book, Nanodreams (Baen Books, August 1995), an anthology of stories and essays on nanotechnology. Dr. Gregory Benford, in the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction (May 1995), called Nanodreams a good example of “firm thinking,” and Scientific American (April 1996) observed that it explores “the societal implications of a nanotechnological future.”

He currently is working on two story cycles, one set on an Alderson Disc, and the other in the same universe as “Lighting Candles On The River Styx” (Amazing, March 1991).

Craig E. Engler is the executive producer for scifi.com, the website of the SciFi Channel. He is the former owner and editor of Science Fiction Weekly, the leading online source for sf news and reviews, which he sold to SciFi in 1999. Craig has written about science fiction for publications ranging from Wired to Yahoo! Internet Life, and he has also served as a consulting sf&f editor for Amazon.com.

James Ernest became known in the Northwest as a comic juggler, then as a graphic artist, and is now known best as the presi-dent of Cheapass Games. Since 1996, James has created more than three dozen games for Cheapass, and has also designed games for other companies including Slag-Blah Entertainment and Wizards of the Coast. He currently lives at his office, which is just fine, because he also works at home.

Alan Fairies lives in Fairie, MT with his furry critter’s and the other fairies. He started writing some years ago and now he has worked on a fanzine, Spacecadets and Dreamers, for a year and has some stories floating around the net here and there. He love’s his friends and has put one or two of them in some very interesting stories! You know who you are! He has many niece’s and nephew’s and spoils them all the time. He has three godchildren— Cassanbra, Sebashtin, and his sister, Zoe.

Craig Figley is a sf artist from the eastern Washington area who fills his life with family, artistic pursuits, the Internet, reading and music. Somewhere amongst all that, he also earns a living as a school psychologist, is active in his church, and even manages to help coach youth soccer. Norwescon regulars know him for his artwork, which has won various awards over the years, his participation on a wide-range of panels (everything from Alien Psychology to Xenophobia in Science Fiction), his convention T-shirt designs and his tendency to lurk in unexpected places. Craig was recently Art Guest of Honor at Rustycon 15 and is prone to dropping names rather shamelessly; he has successfully monopolized several Norwescon Art Guests of Honor for hours at a time, all in the worthwhile cause of learning another artistic trick or two. An old hand with the airbrush and a veteran of several art demos at Norwescon, he is remembered as the guy who once blew up his airbrush hose after unwittingly setting the line pressure at 1800 psi. He is glad to be attending Norwescon this year and looks forward to renewing old acquaintances among the science fiction faithful.

Mel Gilden has written kid’s books, licensed books (three-and-a-half Star Trek novels; 11 Beverly Hills, 90210 novelizations; assorted movie tie-in titles); and episodes of HeMan, Smurfs, James Bond Jr., The Mask, and many other animated TV shows. Adult novels—meaning grown-up, not dirty—include Surfing Samurai Robots and its two sequels. He is a frequent contributor to the Kids Reading Room page of the Los Angeles Times, and for five years he was co-host of Los Angeles' premier science fiction radio program, Hour-25. He is a hopeless Trekkie and lover of old radio.

Since 1989, Steven L. Gillett has been a research professor at the Mackay School of Mines, University of Nevada, Reno, where he’s worked on Paleozoic paleomagnetism, Lunar resources, and seismic risk at Yucca Mountain, NV, the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository. He also teaches intro geology classes including one on planetary geology. Most recently he has focused on molecular nanotechnology as applied to environmental and resource issues, and is even currently funded to do so. Gillett also writes speculative science articles for places like Analog (most recently “Unresources,” 9/99, and “Diamond Ether, Nanotechnology—And Venus,” 11/ 99). His book World-Building, a how-to guide to designing a planet, was published by Writer’s Digest Press in spring 1996. He has also written fiction, often in collaboration. Gillett has a B.S. in geology from Caltech and a Ph.D. from SUNY Stony Brook.

A Writers of the Future grand prize winner (WotF vol 1. VII), James C. Glass has sold over thirty stories to a variety of magazines including Analog, Aboriginal S.F., and Talebones. Shanji, his first novel in mass paperback form, came out last year from Baen Books. Four novels are available in audio editions from Books in Motion, and a selection of his stories can be found on the web at www.alexlit.com.

Jim now writes full-time after recently retiring from a 35 year career as an academic. His research during that career was in molecular biophysics and superconductivity. He and wife, Gail, live in Spokane, and are often see at Northwestern cons.

When she isn’t protecting the castle from mercenaries with Clan Carn (Oh wait! We’re the mercs…), Cheryl Glover will be found building new costumes, dodging errant pins and picking fur bits off the couch. This closet “meeper” has been building costumes since the mid '80s and has recently been the target of furry creature sightings in convention hallways and stages. In her vast amounts of “spare time” (ha) she also dabbles in carpentry, personal web design & acrylic painting, and vows to someday finish a piece of artwork.

In the past David Graham has done programs on the Japanese space program and the Artemis Society. He has written on the use of civil engineering technologies (as opposed to aerospace technology) in Lunar environments. Several of his concepts received awards from the Space Exploration Initiative of the National Space Council and several of his submissions were written up in NASA’s Stafford Report.

Current projects are launching Woolly Mammoth Press, a web-based e-publish-ing and CD effort.

Evelyn Gratrix is the Associate Editor of Indigenous Fiction. She writes fantasy, science fiction, and children’s stories. Her short fiction has been published in the small press. Her current projects include Indigenous Fiction, dark fantasy short stories, and a fantasy novel set in ancient Mesopotamia.

Evelyn is a native Washingtonian and graduated from the University of Washington with a B.S.E.E. (metamorphosing her freshman year from a music major to engineering). She describes herself as “a woman of a certain age” whose avocations include music, ancient history, mythology, and her children.

John R. Gray III (member ASFA) has been showing his artwork at convention art shows nationally since 1981. At these shows he has taken a number of awards, including Best Fantasy, Best Color, Best Use of Humor, Most Unusual Concept, and Director' Choice.

Publishing history includes book and cassette covers, a series of fantasy bookplates, CD-ROM fantasy clip art collections, gaming books and illustrations in various convention program books and fan publications.

Roberta Gregory has been creating strange stuff ever since she first picked up a Crayola. The latest issue (#27) of her notorious comic book, Naughty Bits, visits the 14th century, where Bitchy Bitch is a witch! She has finally published the second part of her graphic novel, Winging It: A Work of Fantasy (for want of a better term to describe something starring angels, horned beasts, anthropomorphic winged horses, and one very confused human being!) And now she’s fooling around with animation.

Jon Gustafson has two bachelor’s degrees, one in fine arts and the other in education. He now works primarily as an editor and art appraiser.

Active in Northwest convention activities, he edited the program book for the 1993 Seattle Westercon, edited the 1992 MagiCon (Worldcon) program book, which was called (by people other than himself, even) the best Worldcon program book ever created, and the 1994 Winnipeg Worldcon program book. In 1988, he edited the MosCon 10 program book, called by Algis Budrys the best convention program book ever produced.

He was one of the founding members of many organizations, including ASFA (the Association of Science Fiction/Fan-tasy Artists), the Northwest Convention League, PESFA (the Palouse Empire Science Fiction Association), MosCon, the Moscow Moffia Writers' Program, Writer’s Bloc, and J. Martin & Associates Literary Agency.

In 1976, he entered professional publishing by writing a history of sf art for Brian Ash’s The Visual Encyclopedia of Science Fiction (1977). In 1978, he wrote sf artists' biographies for Peter Nicholl’s The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction (1979; a Hugo winner) and added more bios for the updated, award-winning version of it (1994). He wrote artists' biographies for James Gunn’s New Encyclopedia of Science Fiction (Viking, 1988) and edited a large fiction anthology titled Rat Tales (Pulphouse Press, 1994).

In 1986, his first work of fiction appeared in Writers of the Future, Volume II anthology, and he has had fiction appear in the legendary The Moscow Moffia Presents Rat Tales anthology and Figment. His first book was a biography: CHROMA: The Art of Alex Schomburg. Jon recently completed editing a series of eight science fiction/fantasy art CD-ROMs. In 1997 he was nominated for a Chesley Award, ASFA’s equivalent of the Hugo Award. He is married to best-selling author V.E. (Vicki) Mitchell.

Rhias K. Hall is the horror and poetry editor for Alexandria Digital Literature, http:/ /www.alexlit.com. She also holds a seat on the board of directors for the Seattle Star Wars Society, and is a member of the Camarilla: a vampire fan organization. In addition to her other activities, she is working on several projects which include the creation a newsletter for the Museum of Death (located in Hollywood, CA.), and a fully annotated script for the film Velvet Goldmine.

Amy Axt Hanson has personally interviewed Apple Computer founder Steve Wozniak, Nobel laureate Glenn T. Seaborg, and Bob Hope in her many years as a science writer at newspapers, magazines, and the “Bill Nye the Science Guy” TV show. Before all that, she was a microbiologist; after all that, she inflicted herself on the good folks at Clarion West. She now has a career as a “do-it-yourselfer,” learning to side houses, caulk windows, teach bio labs, raise children, and write the kind of novel she’s been looking for all these years. (The novel is not yet done, but the house is finally weatherproofed.) In other activities, she helps organize the amazingly wonderful writers—and artists track programming at Wiscon, the feminist science fiction/fantasy convention in Madison, Wisconsin (May 26–29— www.sf3.org/wiscon).

Norman E. Hartman lives in Tigard, Oregon. He is comfortably semi-retired, and his primary occupation these days consists of writing his book review column, “Norm’s Notes,” which appears about four times a year on his web page at: www.teleport.com/nhartman/ normsnotes.com His most recent appearance in print was with his short story Contagion, in Elton Elliott’s anthology, NanoDreams. More recently he has placed several short stories with Alexandria Digital Library, where they are accessible to anyone who has a web browser.

Illustration © 1999 by Christine Mansfield

David G. Hartwell is a Senior Editor of Tor/Forge Books. He is the proprietor of Dragon Press, publisher and bookseller, which publishes The New York Review of Science Fiction, criticism by Samuel R. Delany and other books; and the President of David G. Hartwell, Inc., a consulting editorial firm. He is the author of Age of Wonders and the editor of many anthologies, including The Dark Descent; Masterpieces of Fantasy and Enchantment; The World Treasury of Science Fiction, Northern Stars, The Ascent of Wonder (co-edited with Kathryn Cramer) and a number of Christmas anthologies, among others. Recently he edited the third annual paperback volume of Year’s Best SF. He has won the Eaton Award, the World Fantasy Award, the Science Fiction Chronicle Poll, and has been nominated for the Hugo Award eighteen times to date. He also has theories about fashion in clothing, especially men’s neckties, A lot more info is available at his website.

After moving to Seattle in 1976, Jane Hawkins met Greg Bennett at a organizational meeting for a comics con. The two commiserated about the lack of any SF cons in the Seattle area and Greg has since accused her of impregnating him with the idea of Norwescon. She is one of those stalwart people who manufactured Norwescon from only an idea. Through the years Jane has also worked on various cons around the country and was the Fan Guest of Honor of Norwescon 16.

Howard V. Hendrix is the author of the novels Lightpaths (1997), Standing Wave (1998) and Better Angels (1999). A fourth novel, Empty Cities of the Full Moon, is due out in 2001. Hendrix holds a B.S. in biology as well as an M.A. and Ph.D. in English literature. He taught his first college level class at age 20 and has been teaching for 20 years. He began seeing his short sf in print in 1986 and hasn’t stopped writing since.

Brian Herbert is the author of a number of science fiction novels, including The New York Times best-seller, Dune: House Atreides, which was co-written with Kevin J. Anderson. The writing duo has recently completed Dune: House Harkonnen (the second book in their “Prelude to Dune” trilogy), and have begun work on the third, Dune: House Corrino. Brian has also written Dreamer of Dune, a biography of his illustrious father, Frank Herbert. Brian’s other science fiction novels include: The Race for God (nominated for the Nebula Award); Prisoners of Arionn; Sidney’s Comet, Sudanna, Sudanna; Man of Two Worlds (co-authored with Frank Herbert); The Garbage Chronicles; Blood on the Sun (co-authored with Marie Landis); and Memorymakers (co-authored with Marie Landis). He has also written humor books, has edited several books, and is the creative advisor on the new Dune television mini-series that will star the Academy Award-winning actor, William Hurt.

Photo by Jayana Herbert

Richard Hescox earned a bachelor of fine arts degree from Art Center College of Design in 1972. His first paperback cover for DAW books appeared in 1976, and since then he has produced scores of book covers for nearly every major publisher of fantasy and science fiction. Among his other credits are illustrations for the motion picture industry. He did pre-production illustrations for The Howling and The Philadelphia Experiment. Surrealist paintings for the film House were used as props in the movie. Ad campaigns include E.T., The Dark Crystal, The Fly and Swamp Thing (for which he created the theatrical release poster).

He has since worked with computer games including the acclaimed Ripley’s Believe It or Not "The Riddle of Master Lu and the Rama games, working with Arthur C. Clarke and Gentry Lee.

James P. Hogan is the author of the New York Times best-seller The Proteus Operation and the Prometheus Award-winning Multiplex Man. His other novels include Paths to Otherwhere, Bug Park, Endgame Enigma, and the Giants series.

Born in London, James splits his time between his homes in Ireland and Florida.

The publisher and chief butt-kicker for the Origins Award-nominated role playing fanzine Serendipity’s Circle, Julie Hoverson has been running and writing in the horror gaming genre for over half her life, both for fun and profit. A woman of half-a-dozen faces, Julie is also a costumer who specializes in amusing, odd, and downright cartoony costumes, both for the stage and the halls. She also constructs elaborate sculptures (such as dragons and mermaids) entirely out of beads.

Dave Howell is founder and CEO of Alexandria Digital Literature, a publishing company selling digital fiction via the World Wide Web (www.alexlit.com). He was also the Chairbeing for Foolscap 1, a sf conference held June 11- 13 1999, and was, once upon a time, Employee #7 at Wizards of the Coast, and a member of Norwescon’s concom for #’s 12 through 17. His cat believes he needs to find more free time, as there is an insufficient amount of ear-scratching going on.

Dr. Robert P. Hoyt is a physicist and engineer who has worked on a number of advanced space propulsion concepts, including space tethers for Lunar and Mars transport, electrodynamic tethers for disposal of space junk, magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters for interplanetary missions, and solar thermal propulsion. He is President, CEO, Chief Engineer, and Head Barrista at Tethers Unlimited, Inc., a Se-attle-area space technology startup.

Katie Huddleston writes live trivia games (http://www.scifi.com/mindprobe) for the SciFi Channel’s website and have written TV and movie reviews for Science Fiction Weekly (http://www.scifi.com/sfw) for the last four years. Every fall, she does a TV Preview for Science Fiction Weekly which is a comprehensive look at the upcoming season. You’ll find the last one at http://www.scifi.com/sfw/issuel26/ screen.html.

Kij Johnson is a writer and editor. She has written a fantasy novel, The Fox Woman (currently available in hardcover from Tor Books), and co-written a Star Trek: The Next Generation novel with Greg Cox. She has had dozens of short stories published in markets including Amazing Stories, Analog, Asimov’s, Fantasy & Science Fiction, and Realms of Fantasy. She won the Theodore A. Sturgeon Award for the best short story of 1994 for her novelette in Asimov’s, “Fox Magic.” She has taught writing and science-fiction writing at Louisiana State University, and lectured on creativity and writing at bookstores and businesses across the country.

She works as a program manager for the Microsoft Reader, and lives in Seattle with her husband, a dog, a cat, an aquatic frog, and five motorcycles. For more information, visit her website at http:// www.sff.net/people/kij-johnson.

Ryan K. Johnson is an independent filmmaker living in Seattle who has produced 13 shorts, ranging from parodies to thrillers. He is best known for his Star Trek: The Pepsi Generation, which has appeared on the BBC, and two “homebrew” Mystery Science Theater 3000 movies. An ardent fan of British media, he helped co-found Anglicon (now in its 13th year), started a video club that has met biweekly since 1985, and is the About.com Guide to British Television online.

Kay Kenyon has had three science fiction novels published by Bantam. The latest, Rift, is about terraforming coming unraveled on a planet, and the ways the colonists and a race of aliens must adapt or die. Her first book, The Seeds of Time, is a story of time travel and a galactic search for bio diversity. Kay’s second science fiction novel, Leap Point, is a cautionary tale of virtual reality, first contact with an alien race. Tropic of Creation will come out next winter. She lives with her husband in Edmonds, Washington, and keeps house for a very demanding cat.

Kevin F. Kerr is associate editor of Talebones magazine and a founding member of the Fairwood Writers Group. A 1985 graduate of Clarion West, Kevin’s fiction has been published in Marion Zimmer Bradley’s Fantasy Magazine and Midnight Zoo. He has taught creative writing for Renton Technical College, and has coauthored the computer networking book Inside TOPS. Kevin is currently lab supervisor for Software Testing Laboratories. He lives in Auburn, WA, with his wife Janis and four children.

JoAnne Kirley has been costuming professionally for over twenty years, and while she loves media and fantasy, modern and future fashions, she loves historical best. Her creations have captured Best of Show on Norwescon Masquerade stages, as well as at other events across the country, and her creations have gone on from there to places around the world.

Her costume shop is in Auburn, but you can catch some of her costumes online at http://members.aol.com/dressmup but if you can, visit her shop, you can try things on there!

Currently she is hiring her services out to Village Theater in Issaquah, where she heads the Wardrobe Department. She is in production to create a series of instructional videos as well.

From the shadows of a dormant volcano and the Cascades mountain range, Jim Kling covers the ever-changing world of biotechnology for the webzine HMS Beagle (http://www.hmsbeagle.com). He also writes for print publications, and his work has appeared in Scientific American, Science, Nature Biotechnology, Inc. magazine, and newsletters of the Harvard Business School.

Wolf Lahti is a professional writer, artist, editor, cartoonist, folk musician, photographer, and website designer, and amateur everything else. He lives on five-plus acres in northwestern Washington with two horses, two cats, seven dogs, and one shaman. He is not, nor ever has been, a member of the Communist party.

Jefie “The Grunting Cavalier” Larson has just finished codirecting LepraCon 2000’s Grande Masque with his cohort in crime. He is a mad costumer and has been on a continuous search for the perfect hat for longer than he remembers. But, in between the searching, he can be found on the SCA warfield with sword and shield in the ranks of Clan Carn, or finding new and interesting ways to build costumes. (The more hot, heavy or uncomfortable, the better it must be.)

April Lee is a free-lance illustrator, computer game animator and artist who has worked on a number of CD-ROM games (Heroes of Might and Magic 2 and 3, Might and Magic 6, 7, and 8, Inherit the Earth, Halls of Doom), and also illustrated many computer game manuals and role playing game books. Her collectible card game art may be found in Legend of the Five Rings, Magic, Middle Earth, DoomTown, 7thSea, Shadowfist, Wheel of Time, Xxxenophile, and others. She has displayed and sold original paintings and prints for over ten years, winning awards at Worldcons and Westercons. She holds degrees in illustration from Art Center College of Design, in English literature from Mt. Holyoke College and in history from Oxford University, England. She loves traveling, skiing, reading, and listening to all kinds of music, especially Loreena McKennit and The Cure.

A lifelong activist for peace and justice, Mona Lee lives in Seattle where she is a vocational counselor to disabled people. She was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri. She majored in English at St. Louis University and later earned a master’s degree in counseling psychology from the University of Oregon. She has worked as a counselor in both the United States and Europe.

Photo © 2000 by Nichole DeMent

Nicola Leonard has been working in the game industry as a painter since 1993. She started on Magic and has since painted for Jyhad, Shadowfist, Legend of the Five Rings, Xxxenophile, Legend of the Burning Sands and Dragon Storm. She paints in watercolor and acrylic.

Nicola also designs jewelry and has operated her business, Agauricus (pronounced ah-gor-i-kus), for nine years. Her

Kuo-Yu Liang is the Associate Publisher of Del Rey, a leading publisher of science fiction, fantasy, and alternate history books since 1977. Kuo-Yu is in charge of the day-to-day operations and supervises all aspects of Del Rey’s business, including sales, marketing, editorial, promotions, production rights, publicity and finance. Authors Kuo-Yu publishes at Del Rey includes Greg Bear, Stephan Baxter, Terry Brooks, Orson Scott Card, Arthur C. Clarke, David Eddings, Greg Keyes, Anne McCaffrey, and R.A. Salvatore. Del Rey is the proud publisher of Norwescon’s Guests of Honor Harry Turtledove and Jack Chalker.

Margo Loes, an Aries with the moon in Gemini, has always wanted to go to the stars… but there’s that restraining order thingy. Margo is interested in costumes, art, costumes, theatre, costumes, makeup, costumes, fabrics, costumes, hats, costumes and history. Oh yeah, did she mention costumes? (Actually going to the stars simply opens up lots of new costume and fabric storage space.)

Pat MacEwen is a forensic technician who is also the author of a growing number of published science fiction and fantasy stories. Her work gives her grist for her stories and novels and great, real-life stories to tell.

Pat was Science Guest of Honor at Norwescon 21.

Scott MacHaffie is a lead software engineer with a small company in Tigard, OR, which specializes in math-based software. In his copious amounts of spare time, he has managed to learn and even teach Scottish and Irish dancing. He is also a shodan in aikido with the Oregon Ki Society.

Louise Marley is the author of four novels published by Ace Science Fiction. Sing the Light, Sing the Warmth, and Receive the Gift comprise the science fantasy Singers of Nevya trilogy. The Terrorists of Irustan has received critical acclaim as feminist and social science fiction. Louise recently turned in a fifth novel to Ace, The Glass Hermonica. She has had the short stories “Small in the Saddle,” published by Atomic Westerns, and “Body and Blood,” in the Canadian anthology, Divine Realms, published by Turnstone Press. She has authored a number of nonfiction articles, most recently one for Seattle Opera Magazine about the comprimario artists of the company.

Louise is also a classical concert and opera singer who appears frequently with Seattle Opera, the Seattle Symphony, St. James Cathedral Concerts, and other companies. Her concerts and recitals have taken her across the United States and to Russia and Italy. She taught voice and related subjects at Cornish College of the Arts in Seattle for a number of years, but has left that position to have more time for writing. She recently began a series of workshops for young adult writers.

Louise lives in the Seattle area with her husband and son and is at work on a sixth novel.

Edward Martin III is a frenetic writer who has had fiction, nonfiction, cartoons, comic strips, technical documents, travelogues, humor columns, promotional packages, and the ubiquitous web work (Lose money now! Ask me how!) published. He has completed five motion picture screenplays and is producing two short films for local film festivals. To calm down, he engages in improv comedy, where he frequently forgets his English.

Susan R. Matthews' fourth and latest novel, Avalanche Soldier, steps away from the Jurisdiction universe to follow the spiritual journey of a young woman struggling to reconcile her civic duty with her religious convictions—a theme it has in common with the Koscuisko novels.

Susan lives on Capital Hill in Seattle with Maggie, her domestic partner of 20 years, and two joyful Pomeranian puppies who are not completely clear yet on the concept of “potty training.” Though tempted on a regular basis, she has yet to quit her day job. Check out Susan’s website at www.sff.net/ people/Susan.scribens!

Adrienne Martine-Barnes is the author of fifteen books. She is presently working on an Arthiurian novel, The Last Grail Knight, and several other projects. She lives in Portland, Oregon with a very nice cat, Caitlin, and four thousand volumes, most of which she has actually read.

After an accident left Joan M. McCarty disabled, she came to realize the call of the pen. Since that time she founded Alternate Realities Webzine, an award-winning e-zine of speculative fiction, and, as of this year when it obtained its ISSN, entered the paying market as its Senior Editor. She resides in Portland, Oregon with her family and dogs and from there creates fantasy worlds and alternate histories with a fantasy flair. Her first and second books are currently at the publishers and several short stories have been printed both on the web and in print.

Raven c.s. McCracken is best known for his role playing game, The World of Synnibarr. He hosted a local television program, Rockhard TV, on Channel 13 for many years and just completed work designing the computer game Birthright II, for Synergistic-Sierra On-line.

Currently he is completing his fourth novel, entitled Mage Warrior, along with working on the music, AI and game design for a computer game based on Mike Grell’s comic book series, Tears and Bar Sinister.

Christopher McKitterick’s fiction and nonfiction have appeared in Analog, E-Scape, Extrapolation, and Tomorrow, among other places. Currently, he lives in Seattle with his beautiful monkeygirl, Kij Johnson. He’s a technical editor at Microsoft, and Nominations Director of the Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award for best short science fiction of the year. Chris is just finishing a novel, Empire Ship. Another, Transcendence, is looking for a home with help from his agent, Algis Budrys.

Katherine L. McLean earned a B.A. in fine arts: art with 30 hours toward her master’s degree from WSU and an associate degree in civil engineering technology from Spokane Community College. She has worked for the State of Washington Transportation Department for the last fourteen years. She is currently a CAD operator in a design office in Seattle.

Kathy has participated in a small scale way in the Norwescon art show for a number of years in several different mediums, including colored pencil and glass engraving.

Richard K Michaels is a computer programmer who has been a science fiction fan all his reading life. Frustrated, as many of us have been, by the decline of the midlist and the loss of out-of-print classics, Richard has long wanted to help rectify the situation. With Embiid Publishing, Richard hopes to help guide the future of electronic publishing toward greater author-and reader-friendliness.

Melisa Michaels is the author of nine published science fiction, fantasy, and mystery novels, and a dozen or so articles and short stories. Her most recent books are Cold Iron and Sister to the Rain, published by Roc. With her husband, Richard, she has recently started a new company, Embiid, Inc., a division of which publishes electronic novels for multiple platforms.

Syne Mitchell graduated from college when she was 15 and went on to get a master’s degree in solid-state physics. She now works as a web developer for an online gaming site: www.zone.com. Her short fiction has appeared in markets such as Writers of the Future, MZB’s Fantasy Magazine, and Talebones. Recent accomplishments include selling her first novel, Murphey’s Gambit, to be published by ROC in December 2000.

Photo © 2000 by Dominic Arizona Bonuccelli

N. Monique Hayes is now N. Monique Mitchell, living in Tacoma with two husbands, and has found a boyfriend who just adores that bulldyke Plymouth she persists in driving. Her art studio has been upgraded, and all else is well in the Coma of the Coast!

Victoria E. Mitchell has been involved in science fiction for over 20 years. She joined PESFA in 1977 and soon became one of the core members of the group. She was one of the founding members of MosCon, Writer’s Bloc, the Moscow Moffia Writer’s Program, and J. Martin & Associates Literary Agency. She has four college degrees, including a master’s in geology and an M.B.A., and is currently working on her fifth, a Ph.D. in geology. She works full-time as a geologist for the Idaho Geological Survey.

Vicki has been writing for as long as she can remember. In 1986, she won the national Amazing Stories Calendar Story Contest and sold a short story to a mainstream anthology. In 1987, she had a story appear in the legendary The Moscow Moffia Presents Rat Tales anthology and had a different “Rats” story accepted for the other Rat Tales (1994) anthology from Pulphouse Publishing. Her first novel, Enemy Unseen (a Star Trek novel from Pocket Books, which has also appeared in English and German versions), appeared in 1990 and spent three weeks on the New York Times Best Seller list. She has had three more Star Trek books published since then. She also sold a novella to Amazing Stories, which was published in May and June, 1992. She continues to work on novels, short stories, and articles. She is married to Jon Gustafson and is owned by a gigantic and excessively silly dog named Shilo.

Mike Moscoe’s latest book, The Price of Peace, continues his far future science fiction saga full of starships and human struggle begun with The First Casualty. Look for Who Stand and Wait coming in January 2001. With “Lost Days,” Mike completes the story he started in “First Dawn” and “Second Fire,” but not Launa and Jack’s adventures 6,000 years ago. Analog will soon publish Mike’s latest novelette, about his toddler granddaughter’s future first job, delivering pizza… on the moon.

Growing up Navy, Mike learned early about geography, change, and the chain of command. He’s worked as a bartender and cab driver, personnel officer and labor negotiator. Now that he’s retired from his last day job of building databases about the critters of the Northwest, both the endangered ones and the ones endangering them, he can concentrate on writing. In retirement, he’s looking forward to a serious study of human folly and glory.

He lives in Vancouver, Washington, with his wife Ellen. He enjoys reading, writing, watching grandchildren for story ideas and upgrading his computer—all are never ending.

In a career spanning nearly 20 years with TSR and Wizards of the Coast, Kim Mohan has done just about anything an editor can do. He currently serves as Managing Editor for Wizards RPG R&D and as Editorin-Chief of Amazing Stories Magazine. His hobbies include stamp collecting, eating, and wishing he had more time to play games on his computer.

Pamela Mohan straddles two departments at Wizards of the Coast, Inc. She is the Events Publications Manager for Event Marketing/Management and Associated Editor for Amazing Stories Magazine. In her spare time, she enjoys gourmet cooking, reading, and playing with her dogs, Justice (an appropriately named German Shepherd) and Cody (a canine of unknown heritage).

After nine years of college and two masters' degrees (English literature and theatre) Betsy Mott decided to be a professional artist. For over fifteen years her media portrait and fantasy paintings have been seen in science fiction art shows all over the country. Her work can also be seen on MacMillan’s Imagine It! SciFi CD-ROM, on the Landmark and Great Warrior series of notecards and in fanzines and collections around the world. Her awards include Best of Show, Best Fantasy, Best Two Dimensional, Best Body of Work, People’s Choice, Best Color, Best Science Fiction, Best Pro Artist, and many others. She is listed in the Directory of American Artists and is a member of ASFA. Betsy is a fourth generation native of Spokane, a Mensan, and a Mayflower descendent. Her hobbies include gaming, kayaking, researching obscure subjects and playing trumpet in local pit orchestras and wind ensembles.

Jamil Nasir has sold fiction to Asimov’s, Universe (vols 1, 2, and 3), Interzone, Aboriginal SF, Best of the Rest, and Angels! He won first prize in the 1988 Writers of the Future competition.

His third novel, Tower of Dreams, is nominated for the Philip K. Dick Award.

Rebecca Neason is the author of numerous nonfiction articles which, along with her poetry, have been featured in regional, national and international publications. In 1988 she was awarded a Certificate of Recognition for Outstanding Literary Merit by the Pacific Northwest Writers Conference and she is a graduate of the Clarion West Writers' Workshop. A frequent speaker at local science fiction conventions, Ms. Neason also lectures on pre-Christian through Medieval British History, Middle English, and the development of English as a written language, and she works with elementary school children on developing the creative process. She plays four musical instruments and, specializing in Celtic folk music, is a participant in such yearly events as the Celtic Arts Showcase and the Seattle Scottish Highland Games.

Ms. Neason is the author of Highlander: The Path and the bestselling Star Trek: The Next Generation novel, Guises of the Mind.

[Ad] Westercon 54

WESTERCON 54

IT’S IN THE OTHER HOTEL Millennium!
PORTLAND, OREGON
DULY 5–8, 2001

AUTHOR GOH: TIM POWERS
FAN GOH: MIKE GLYER
EDITOR GOH: TERRI WINDLING
ARTIST GOH: FRANK LURZ

We will be at the DoubleTree Hotel Jantzen Beach And Doubletree Columbia River in beautiful Portland, Oregon

Contact us by mail or on the web:

URL: http://www.osfci.org/w2OOl
Phone: [redacted] Email: deaner@pacifier.com

Westercon 54
PO Box 5901
Portland, OR 97228–5901

MEMBERSHIPS ARE ONLY $40.00 UNTIL JULY 15, 2000
Supporting memberships: $20.00
Children 12 and under: half price
Children 6 and under: free.

“Westercon” is a service mark of the Los Angeles Science Fantasy Society SPONSORED BY OREGON SCIENCE FICTION CONVENTIONS, INC.

Guests (cont.)

Timothy S. O’Brien was born in the Pacific Northwest. He has degrees in research and writing, comparative religion and mythology, and game studies, and currently works as a contractor for Microsoft Corporation’s Intellectual Properties Development Group. Tim is currently a gaming professional with credits in the Star Wars Second Edition, Ars Magica Fourth Edition, and Star Trek role playing games. Tim is currently consulting on both the board and computer game versions of Crimson Skies, an alternative history pulp fiction plane combat game. For fun, Tim kills his friends in Call of Cthulhu, Star Wars, Ars Magica, and other role playing games, and in his remaining spare time creates, develops, nurtures, and destroys fictional worlds.

Brian D. Oberquell has been working in the special FX field for almost 20 years, ranging from live theatre to film and television; his recent projects include Seven Days and the Brian DePalma film Mission to Mars (if you see him, ask him how long it took him to wash off all the Martian dust, and his opinion on the “glamour of the film industry”).

He currently resides in Port Moody, BC with his wife and pet rabbit.

Margaret Organ-Kean’s most important goal is to evoke a sense of magic on paper, a goal she kept through three universities (Boston University, Central Washington University and the University of Washington) and three majors before settling down to get a B.A. in art history in the regulation four years. It helped that all her majors had been related to art.

Currently she works in watercolor or pen-and-ink, and is beginning to work on the computer using Bryce, Fractal Paint, Photoshop and some other graphic programs (you can view her computer work at http://www.alexicom.net/moonstone). She uses photographic reference more extensively than she used to, with the result that not only are her paintings better, but her friends and family are showing up in the oddest places!

She lives with her husband in the north end of Seattle, and in her spare time enjoys reading fantasy and science fiction, walking around Green Lake, and baking gingerbread—but is busy enough painting that she doesn’t spend much time on these hobbies!

Actor, author, soldier, cop: Alan Paulsen’s adventures and misadventures have included tracking down murderers, fighting forest fires, parachuting out of perfectly good airplanes and exploring pyramids. Active in local theatre, Alan has landed his first movie role and can be seen this fall in a Sylvester Stallone film entitled Get Carter. A published writer, Alan is currently working on his second novel. Alan is a member of the Valentine Armouries fight demo team and chief among his hobbies is riding his horse, Beau Geste.

Peter Dennis Pautz was born in New Jersey and takes a piece of it everywhere, including to his work as a marriage and family therapist. He served as the Executive Secretary of the Science-Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, Inc., for 20 years, and has been President of the World Fantasy Awards Association since 1981. (Having occasionally wielded the shovel, he knows where the bodies are buried.) He co-edited the World Fantasy Award-winning anthology, The Architecture of Fear, with Kathryn Cramer, and Nebulas Winners Fifteen with Frank Herbert.

Brooks Peck is the Editor-in Chief of Science Fiction Weekly, the online news and review magazine of the SciFi Channel. He’s also had his short fiction published in a variety of anthologies including, most recently, Merlin, and the upcoming Side Reality.

John Pelan has been active in the field for over ten years, both as a writer and as edi-tor/publisher of the highly regarded imprint Silver Salamander Press. As a writer John and his frequent collaborator Edward Lee are often referred to as the “Tag-Team Champions of Hardcore Horror.” Among their recent works are the novella Goon published by Necro Press and “The Piano Player Has No Fingers” in the 1996 issue of Palace Corbie. John and his wife Kathy reside in Seattle and have attended each Norwescon since Norwescon 7.

Ray Pelley received his degree in fine arts from Illinois State University. After graduation he worked in commercial art on a part time basis. He lived for a time in Illinois, Tennessee, and Massachusetts. He then began traveling extensively throughout the United States. He has spent time in Colorado, Utah, Arizona, and California before finally settling permanently in Washington state.

Ray has been living and working as an artist in the Pacific Northwest since 1979. In 1980 he began selling his original seri-graphs on the crafts table at Pike Place Market. There he found a receptive audience for his work and subsequently began showing his works in SF convention art shows and juried arts and crafts fairs throughout the Pacific Northwest. His work has been published both as interior illustrations and covers for a wide variety of books and publications. He has had successful shows in many galleries and his work may now be found in several galleries in Washington state. His original oil paintings are currently represented by the Gunnar Nordstrom Gallery in Kirkland.

Puzzle Box—Paul Kwinn, Taunya Gren, Alisa Garcia

Karen Rall entered fandom in 1987, and promptly spent several years running Volunteers, Security and Logistics at various Northwest conventions. She rediscovered the joy of actually attending programming during a break for graduate school and now sticks to running Folk Music activities and few errands on site, and helping with the occasional overall Programming track in advance. In her “spare time” she maintains an active social life, practices with the NW Irish Dancers and avidly recruits new followers for Babylon 5. She also continues to study Celtic history, ongoing events in the space program, and the belief systems of various cultures.

Ken Rand writes “semi-full-time” from his home in West Jordon, Utah. He’s sold fiction to Writers of the Future volume 13 (second place), Star Trek: Strange New Worlds volume 2 (third place), Weird Tales, Pulphouse, Aboriginal, Quantum SF 1999, and others.

He writes a lot of nonfiction, including interviews for Talebones magazine. He’s written for Speculations, SFWA Bulletin, Science Fiction Chronicle, and Starlog among others. He wrote The Ten Percent Solution: Self-editing for the Modern Writer for Fairwood Press.

He makes kaleidoscopes for fun. His living and working philosophy: “Lighten up.” His web site: www.sfwa.org/mem-bers/Rand/.

Rich Redman has been a science fiction fan since he could read (anybody else remember Tom Swift, Jr.?) and a gamer for roughly the last 20 years. He received a bachelor’s degree in foreign affairs from the University of Virginia on an Army ROTC scholarship. His active duty assignment included Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm. After the army, Rich worked as a PC repairman, a salesman (both retail and door-to-door), and is now the customer service supervisor for Wizards of the Coast.

Paul Reed’s mother is still amazed that all the quarters he blew on video games managed to pay off somehow. A native of the Pacific Northwest, Paul has worked for several prominent game companies including Nintendo, Squaresoft, and Electronic Arts. His credits include the role playing games Secret of Evermore, and Shadow Madness. He is currently hard at work designing a new RPG for the Sony PlayStation, and would like to plead innocent of all charges.

John H. Reiher, Jr. has been involved in the sf and gaming communities since 1975. He was one of the first playtesters for Tri Tac Systems, then known as Ticky-Tac Games. He worked as a free-lance game designer for Tri Tac for a couple of years, then became editor of a short lived newsletter for one of their games. He later signed on as a writer for two other newsletters, Terror Watch and Infinite Crossroads, and has written an sf short story for a small press group in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Currently he is working for a large software manufacturer based in Redmond, WA, and for hobbies counts physical therapy and microbrewing as two sides of the same coin.

Janet Rhodes has had short stories included in four Darkover anthologies and in Marion Zimmer Bradley’s Fantasy Magazine. She has worked in the environmental field for over 25 years and has a degree in microbiology. In recent years, she has studied herbology, massage, and counseling. Her first science fiction novel, taking place on an alien planet where hostility between two sentient subspecies has led to infanticide, is nearly ready to send to a publisher

Janet facilitates meetings and workshops and is a volunteer mediator with the county dispute resolution center.

A.E. Roberts graduated from Clarion West in 1985. He joined the newly-formed Eugene Professional Writer’s Workshop soon after. His first fiction sale was printed in the Summer issue of Marion Zimmer Bradley’s Fantasy Magazine. He is trying to survive as a full-time writer.

Alan Rodgers is the author of Bone Music, Pandora, Fire, Night, Blood of the Children, The Bear Who Found Christmas, Ghosts Who Cannot Sleep, and New Life for the Dead. Blood of the Children was a nominee for the Horror Writers of America Bram Stoker award; his first story (actually a novelette), “The Boy Who Came Back from the Dead,” won a Stoker and lost a World Fantasy Award. During the mid-eighties he edited the fondly-remembered horror digest, Night Cry. He lives in San Dimas, California where he sees his two daughters, Alexandra and Andrea Rodgers, and his son, Abram Rodgers, and often as circumstances and custody arrangements allow.

Beverly Marshall Saling was the second paid employee at Wizards of the Coast, where she has edited role playing games, trading card games, family games, and many other game-related materials. She especially enjoyed her most recent project, Wizards' upcoming MLB Showdown 2000 card game, which let her surf the Web for the latest baseball stats and call it working. Known for her ability to discuss Celtic mythology, cat-bathing techniques, and the serial comma with equal aplomb, Beverly recently left Wizards and now spends her time working on a variety of free-lance projects and catching up on nine years' worth of reading.

Pippin Sardo likes to play dress-up and dance and has been frequently known to make a fool out of herself on stage at Worldcons, Costumecons, Westercons, Norwescons, OryCons, and their little cons, too. She’s a historical costumer, a costume historian, a dancer and teacher of vintage dance, and she dabbles in science fiction and fantasy costuming in her more insane moments. She co-founded Somewhere in Time, Unltd. and performs historic and flamenco dance. You might have seen her most recently as the Seattle Mermaid or in past moments of glory as the moon in “2001, a Space Ballet in Less Than Two Minutes,” or a Mercilette to Madame Ming. (Although she knows what barbarians really wore, she happily volunteers to help any Conan wanna-bes with their brass accoutrements!)

After 20 years of costuming and interest in SF, Lisa L. Satterlund is finally starting to figure out what’s going on. She’s discovered that working on the masquerade gets you the best view of the costumes and that being on panels lets you meet neat people. With a background that includes law and librarianship, she knows where to find things out but not always what to do with the information.

Nels E. Satterlund is currently a manager at Intel Corp. Over the past 19 years he’s been involved in the electronics industry in many roles. Among his many skills, he is one of the world’s best bubble memory board designers and has worked on a number of other projects, including LAN and modem products. Currently he is involved in platform development for advanced processor testing.

His fannish involvement stems from PESFA and its pre-Moscon days. Moscon is the only convention he attends regularly.

As unconventional as her name, Spring Schoenhuth has been a taco bender, archaeologist, actress, credit investigator, legal aide, historian, scenic designer, radio announcer, artist, jewelry designer/cre-ator, and educator from preschool special education to college level. She has way too many college credits to speak of and consequently thinks she knows everything. She concurrently works for three East Bay school districts, and in her copious spare time also works for a large retail fine jewelry store. She also owns Springtime Creations, purveyor of exotic and fun jewelry (whose work has been seen in Star Trek: Deep Space Nine). Her passions include paleontology, shopping, travel, clothes, astronomy, shopping, fashioning fun and fine jewelry and shaping future generations of readers of science fact, fiction and fantasy. She currently resides with her longtime love, Dave, in Dublin, California.

Richard A. Scott is also known as the Nefarious Spunky Cheese. In his long con career he has been responsible for the most acts of sheer ludicrousness. He has seen publication in DC comics Avatar, as well as having been a “staff artist” for the second incarnation of Science Fiction Review. He has recently assisted Andy Mangles with his new book From Scream to Dawson’s Creek. Out now!

He is currently “seeking new projects” and seeks to control all of existence. He is currently with Platinum studios.

Lorelei Shannon was born in the Arizona desert and learned to walk holding on to the tail of a coyote. She is now a writer, computer game designer, sculptor, and punk belly dancer. Her short stories have appeared in a number of anthologies and magazines. Her last game, A Puzzle of Flesh, was banned in three foreign countries, and Sears department stores everywhere!

Lisa Smedman is the author of the Shadowrun novels, The Lucifer Deck, Blood Sport, and Psychotrope. She has also had a number of short science fiction and fantasy stories published in various magazines and anthologies, and in 1993 was a finalist in the Writers of the Future Contest. Formerly a newspaper reporter and magazine editor, she now works as a free-lance game designer and fiction writer. She has designed a number of adventures and written short fiction for TSR’s Ravenloft and Dark Sun lines, and has designed gaming products for Star Wars, Indiana Jones, Cyberpunk, Immortal, Shatterzone, and Millennium’s End.

GregRobin AV Smith is a writer, poet, historian and educator, as well as an accomplished singer and musician. As General Manager of A Knight’s Tour, an interactive education company, he’s developed curriculum about: “Medieval Life;” “Period Poetic Forms;” “Shakespeare and His Au-dience/His World” and “The History of Shrewsbury Abbey.” Currently he’s working on a project to connect museums with artisans who will supply duplicated “artifacts” for hands-on displays. GregRobin is a bard for Renaissance Magazine. He’s also been published in Chronique and The Journal of Chivalry. For further info, browse www.knightstour.org.

Kristine Smith works as a process development scientist for a large pharmaceutical manufacturer. Her first novel, Code of Conduct, is nominated for the Philip K. Dick Award.

Terri “Sprite” Specht has been doing theatrical costuming and makeup and FX makeup for longer that she will admit. She is currently working to expand her repertoire to include historical costuming. Sprite has done makeup for many Best of Show and Best of Class—Master masquerade winners. She has also won Best of Class—Journeyman and Best in Show for her costumes at local masquerades.

Sprite has volunteered at The Taproot Theater (a small community theater) and with a North Seattle high school drama department. She enjoys sharing what she has learned in makeup and costuming with others and in encouraging people to try new ideas and to expand their abilities.

Renee Stern is a former newspaper reporter turned free-lance writer. When not working for trade publications on topics ranging from growing apples to building furniture, she also writes fantasy novels. She is a member of the Fairwood Writers Group in Kent, Washington.

Edward V. Stiner found science fiction in a 1950s school library. He read every Norton, Heinlein, Anderson, Clarke, and Vance story he could find. Since then, only the authors have changed. After a tour in the nuclear navy aboard the U.S.S. Enterprise, he got a job in the computer industry, where he continues to work. For several years he owned a game and comic book store. He has edited and published The Die Hard Collector’s Checklist, Event One and Star Pulse. In 1990 he founded the organization that became The Science Fiction Museum, and is still on the Board of Directors. He is also on the board of Virtual Adventures, a new high tech entertainment company.

John Strongbow, son of outlaw Long Sean Strongbow, turned his back on his family’s pirate ways and vowed to devote himself to the arts in an effort to give back something to the people his family have plundered so long and frivolously.

Deborah K. Strub has been making and wearing costumes at Pacific Northwest conventions and SCA events for over 10 years. Some of her memorable masquerade costumes include “Satana, The Devil’s Daughter,” “Samurai Kitty,” the dancer in “The Wrath of Ra,” and “Katahira-Ainu Spellweaver.” She specializes in medieval Japanese costume and is currently working on a comprehensive “History of Japanese Costume” class for the University of Ithra. “No costume is complete without cat hair.”

Patrick & Honna Swenson edit and publish the quarterly semi-pro sf magazine Talebones. The magazine has two stories on the Preliminary Nebula this year. It has also had a Genre Writer’s Association award for Best New Magazine/Editor, a nomination for an International Horror Guild Award for Best Publication, and Honorable Mentions in The Year’s Best Fantasy & Horror and The Year’s Best Science Fiction. The parent company, Fairwood Press, has published two chapbooks so far including a writing reference by Ken Rand entitled The 10% Solution: Self-editing for the Modern Writer, and a collection called Zom Bee Moo Vee & Other Freaky Shows by Mark McLaughlin. You can get more information about the magazine from their web page at: http://www.fairwoodpress.com

Patrick and Honna have sold stories to such markets as Marion Zimmer Bradley’s Fantasy Magazine, Dialogue, Figment, Epitaph, Keen SF, Northwest Writers, and other small press magazines. Patrick, a high school English teacher, is a graduate of the Clarion West Writers' Workshop, and also plays in The Kings of Swing, a seventeen piece Big Band. Honna, an optician, plays top level soccer and often, with Patrick, teaches evening writing classes. The Swensons are members of the Fairwood Writers Group, based in Seattle.

David Tackett was raised by wolves and founded Rome. He fell in love with F&SF at age four—can leap tall sewing machines in a single bound, twist fabric with his bare hands, makes costumes and props from other people’s trash. He’s pretty sure the fantasy world is the real one. He likes Irish Cream and freckled brunettes. And, not to brag, he is a genius; but only for about 30 seconds a day…

Janet (Cullen) Tanaka and husband, Mike, are living the retired life (of leisure?) in Lacey, Washington. Janet’s professional life has spanned several careers; primarily writing and editing, geohazard planning consultant, folk-gospel singing, and citizen activist and appointed bureaucrat in the field of geohazards. She has also been, and is, an active lay teacher in the Baha’i Faith. Janet is currently reviving her previous publication, Volcano Quarterly, as an e-zine called just VQ.

She is a member of the international Association of Volcanology, Association for Women in Geoscience, Northwest Geology Society, Interfaith Council of Washington, a Star Trek fan club, the Planetary Society, and Skeptics Society, as well as the local Ministerial Association and a Baha’i choir.

“The train of my life runs on the rails of science and religion with my family being the ties.”

As the granddaughter and niece of professional seamstresses, Anita Taylor has been sewing and costuming since childhood. When not at her day job as a technical writer and project manager, she writes children’s stories and historical fiction, is a neophyte amateur astronomer, enjoys flying, sailboat racing, and builds model airplanes —remember the Ornithopter at Norwescon 20? Anita also currently serves as secretary for the Beyond Reality Costumer’s Guild.

Born in 1947, Bruce Taylor was raised in Seattle, his current home. Early in life he was drawn to science fiction, particularly the works of Jules Verne, H.G. Wells, C.S. Lewis, and Ray Bradbury. Later, he became equally familiar with Dostoevsky, Flaubert, Steinbeck, Chapek, Kafka, and Chekov.

He attended the UW, where he received a B.A. in sociology while also writing for the UW Daily and studying fiction with such teachers as Jack Leahy and Jack Cady. After leaving college he worked a number of jobs before taking a job as a counselor at Harborview Medical Center on the locked inpatient psychiatric unit. After a great deal of work in hypnosis and psychotherapy, Taylor now teaches classes at Harborview on stress management techniques.

Brian Tillotson has been paid to figure out how to use dirt as rocket propellant, design spacecraft as large as Seattle and as small as the palm of your hand, program a robot to learn from experience, work in zero gravity aboard NASA’s Vomit Comet, levitate water with a magnet, and measure how much stars twinkle. He is the author of over 20 published technical papers and a nonfiction fantasy article. He writes science fiction in his spare time.

Joseph Traub has been involved with computers and programming since he was 14 and a professional in the computer industry for the past eight years. During that, time he has worked on things as far ranging as computer games and e-mail/list servers to multi-user online games. He is also a pagan (mostly solitary currently) and a practicing polyamorist. I’ve been involved in the con community since he was 18. He became involved with the local con and filk community when I moved here seven years ago. In addition to hosting semi-monthly Seattle area filks, he also run the northwest filk mailing list.

Valentine Armouries was started by Robert Valentine about 18 years ago. He has excelled in art all his life, winning art scholarships for oil painting, and trying most mediums. After discovering metal sculpturing, he immediately began to fulfill his boyhood dream to create his own suit of armour. Over the years his range of armour has grown substantially, and he now employs four full-time apprentices and is the owner of the largest armour making company in North America.

Chris Vancil was born in Washington in the mid 1950s and has spent a large percent of his life here. He graduated from The Evergreen State College in the early '80s with a BA in visual arts. While he never made his living doing art, Chris did work as a technician at COCA in Seattle for a couple of seasons. Contracting and remodeling houses is how he mainly made a living.

Being a product of the second half of the 20th century and an eye witness to the beginnings of the Space Age, Chris is, for want of a better term, a Space Enthusiast. He is an active member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, International Artemis Society, National Space Society and of course the Mars Society. All of these organizations have one goal in common getting us into space! He is presently the vice-president of NSS Seattle and the contact person for the Puget Sound Chapter of the Mars Society. Ad Astra!

Diana Vick is an illustrator, writer, pirate aficionado, and avid dancer. Her artwork can be seen on those pesky collectible cards in such games as Magic, Legend of the Five Rings, Shadowfist, Deadlands, and Seventh Sea. Despite not gaming, she finds the work challenging and fascinating to research. During her art directorship at MU Press, she helped create several titles including Beauty of the Beasts and Wild Kingdom. Her popular character, Cap’n Kate, saw her nascence there and graced her own book in 1999. A hobby of collecting cloisonne pins led her to design several for MU. Now living in Ballard, Diana continues to perpetrate ghastly puns, create magical art and cause her mother to murmur “Why can’t she wear normal clothes?”

Ray Vukcevich’s new novel is The Man of Maybe Half-a-Dozen Faces from St. Martin’s Minotaur. His short story “By The Time We Get to Uranus” is in The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror (Twelfth Annual Collection), and his short fiction has appeared in Aboriginal, Asimov’s, Fantasy and Science Fiction, Pulphouse, Talebones, Rosebud, The Urbanite, Sirius Visions, and several anthologies. He is working on another novel.

Philip P. Wagner (aka “The Doctor”) has shown at various science fiction convention art shows, including Norwescon and Rustycon. His media are watercolors and acrylics, which incorporate the beauty of the female form into various fantasy settings. In his foil art, he is trying to achieve a three-dimensional effect through whimsical settings. The finished pieces are highly labor intensive and require careful thought for composition. Phil works mainly from photographs and will do commission pieces upon request (ask for prices).

A native Californian, Katie Waitman began writing and illustrating original stories and poems when she was 8 years old. Her first novel, The Merro Tree, was Del Rey’s Discovery of the Year for 1997 and won the 1998 Compton Crook Award for Best Science Fiction Novel. Her second work, The Divided (Del Rey, February 1999) was inspired in part by her 1995 visit to Egypt and Jordon. She has completed a sequel to The Merro Tree entitled The Roots of Forgiveness and is currently working on a new piece of science fiction tentatively called The Image Maker.

Kathy Watts used to live in L.A. and locate earthquakes for a living. Now she lives in a small costal town and writes darn near any kind of fiction that can have a ghost in it.

Burt Webb has appeared on radio, television, and in print on such topics as biology, psychology, SETI, robotics, artificial intelligence, nanotechnology, virtual reality, and autonomous software agents. He also wrote a science column for Science Fiction Review.

He starred in the SF short film Eat the Sun and contributed computer graphics to Star Trek: The Search for Spock. He is coauthor of the action screenplay The Tracker, which is nearing production in Australia. Other script collaborations in-clude Shadowmaster, Terraforma, Blackout, and Spellbinder. He is currently the president of Northwest CyberArtists Productions which is an organization dedicated to combining art and technology.

Scott Welch is the Executive Vice President of Bridge Publications, publishers of the works of L. Ron Hubbard. He began consulting with the firm in 1983 and came up with the idea of the 30-foot tall inflatable alien, Teri, from Battlefield Earth, which was toured around the world. He has also been connected with the Writers of the Future Contest almost since its inception and launched the Illustrators Contest in 1988 at LosCon.

Duane Wilkins is the Science Fiction Buyer and Assistant Children’s Buyer for the University Book Store in Seattle. His life was warped at an early age when his sister handed him a copy of Rocket Ship Galileo, and said “read this”. A native Seattleite, he has been a bookseller for nearly fifteen years, working not only on buying and displaying titles, but also arranging author readings and signings. He is also a reviewer, whose work has regularly appeared in Talebones, as well as Westwind and the UBS Footnotes.

Robyn Sondra Wills was hatched under a Roc on November 21, 1951. Being related to both Benedict Arnold and Lord Mountbatten, she considers herself most properly English—Welsh to be exact (Let’s no' be havin' any more o' that traitorous talk about that heathen George! Fo' me own part, shall we be singin' the praises of Saint Draconius?). All things considered, a strange duck in any pond. Well traveled (airline brat and ex-military), reasonably educated from 15 as an avionics technician for Uncle Sam’s Canoe Club (not to mention getting 3/4 the way through an electrical engineering degree at Illinois Institute of Technology), Robyn came out of the closet and began to take her hobby of writing seriously a few years back. The strangeling first became published with Alternate Realities Webzine (www.alternaterealitieszine.com), has a currently running series, “Reasons For Revenge,” which landed her the job as Fantasy and Poetry Editor for Alternate Realities Webzine. Due to this involvement, she was approached by Dancing Willow (a new e-book publisher) resulting in a pending deal for two novels. Since the children have left the roost, Robyn now lives in Portland having grown tired of her long time, flatland home of Chicago.

Johnny L. Wilson is the Group Publisher of Amazing Stories, Dragon, Dungeon, and TopDeck magazines. He came to Wizards of the Coast from Ziff-Davis where he served as Editorial Director for Computer Gaming World. At Wizards of the Coast, Johnny’s main claim to fame has been retooling Duelist magazine into TopDeck and having enough sense not to publish any of his fiction in Amazing Stories. The only game reviewer to be named Best Software Reviewer by the Software Publishers Association, Johnny is an avid gamer who loves his current job because it blends all of his favorite pastimes into one job: role playing, strategy, science fiction, and fantasy. He also raises hackles in some conservative communities because of his background as a Southern Baptist minister and his insistence that gaming is not demonic.

Janna Wright has been active in the fan community for the past eight years, coinciding with the founding of White Wolf’s official fan organization, The Camarilla. After a few years of toiling at a local game company, she found intriguing employment with Alexandria Digital Literature, a web-based electronic publisher of science fiction, fantasy, and horror literature. She continues to free-lance as research support in the role-playing games industry, and maintains an avid and unhealthy interest in all things morbid.

Janine Ellen Young is the author of Cinderblock, a “groundbreaking example of Carrollian speculative fiction.” An instructor at Santa Monica College, she has been lecturing and teaching classes on speculative fiction for twelve years and, recently, was a guest speaker at the Mt. Saint Antonio’s Writer’s Conference. Her new novel, The Bridge, a story of first contact, astronomy, and microbiology, will be out from Warner Books in September. Cinderblock made Locus magazine’s 1997 Year in Review Recommended First Novel list.

[Artwork] Cyborg © 2000 by Barclay Shaw. Acrylic, 1979.

[Ad] Gross Prophets

If I were a cassowary On the plains of Timbuctoo, I would eat a missionary, Cassock, band, and hymn-book too.

Bishop Samuel Wilberforce

A GROSS PROPHETS PRODUCTION with a grant from the Addams Family Foundation.

Members

[Artwork] Songs from the Drowned Lands © 2000 by Barclay Shaw. Cover for the book by E. Kernaghan, published by Ace Books, 1982. Acrylic.

Members of Norwescon 23 as of March 17, 2000

[Member list redacted]

[Artwork] Organic Perch © 2000 by Barclay Shaw. Originally published by Heavy Metal, 1983. Arcylic.

[Artwork] Work in Progress © 2000 by Barclay Shaw. Originally published by Heavy Metal, 1993. Mixed media.

Ack

ADVERTISERS

Ace: 21
Boston in 2004: 22
Dragonflight 2000: 9
Eos/HarperPrism: 16, 17
HarperCollins: Inside Front Cover
Northwest Science Fiction Society: 34
Seattle Westercon Bid: Inside Back Cover
Talking Rain: 27
University Book Store: 25
Westercon 54 in Portland: 47

We would like to thank the following for their help:

Stacy Anderson
AV-Pro
Bellevue Regional Library
Jack Beslanwitch
Jennifer Brehl
Capitol City Press, Inc.
Designers Service Bureau
Federal Way 320th Library
Gerry Ann LaPlante
Gordon LaPlante
Gayle MacArthur
George Nyhen
Offworld Designs
Talking Rain
Gordon Van Gelder
Lisa Woodings

Ben Schreiber and the Norwescon Registration Staff would like to thank all of the volunteers who participated in the special volunteer events and bugbashing efforts, and helped make sure that the new Registration system will run smoothly.

Capitol City PRESS
Olympia’s Business Printer for Over 20 Years
116 Capitol Way N. [redacted] Downtown Olympia
www.capitolcitypress.com

AV-PRO
Audio-Visual Products, Inc.
825 South Dakota St.
Seattle WA. 98108
[redacted]
Vendor for Norwescon A/V and other convention needs.

[Ad] Westercon

WERE BRINGING WESTERCON BACK TO WESTERN WASHINGTON
HELP MAKE IT HAPPEN

SWOC
the Seattle Westercon Organizing Committee
invites you to an open SWOC meeting on Sunday to find out about our Westercon bid and about what else SWOC is doing Visit us on the web at:
http://www.sfnorthwest.org/swoc
email: swoc@webwitch.com

THE SEA-TAC WESTERCON 56 BID
welcomes you to visit us at our table or come party with us on Friday night and see what all the excitement is about and why we want to bring the 2003 Westercon to the SeaTac DoubleTree on July 4th Weekend. Visit on the web at:

http;//www. webwitch.com/westercon56/
email: westercon56-info@webwitch.com

Collection

Citation

Michael Brocha, “Norwescon 23 Program Book,” Norwescon History, accessed June 17, 2024, https://history.norwescon.org/items/show/587.

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